Nature

  • Most Topular Stories

  • 'Green Revolution' changes breathing of the biosphere: Stronger seasonal oscillations in carbon dioxide linked to intensive agriculture

    Nature News -- ScienceDaily
    19 Nov 2014 | 10:26 am
    The intense farming practices of the 'Green Revolution' are powerful enough to alter Earth's atmosphere at an ever-increasing rate, boosting the seasonal amplitude in atmospheric carbon dioxide to about 15 percent over the past five decades. That's the key finding of a new atmospheric model, which estimates that on average, the amplitude of the seasonal oscillation of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is increasing at a rate of 0.3 percent every year.
  • A global vision

    Nature - Issue - nature.com science feeds
    17 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    A global vision Nature 515, 7527 (2014). doi:10.1038/515311a The International Council for Science needs to define its mission and show its members that it is worth their membership fees.
  • Lucy discoverer on the ancestor people relate to

    NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
    Ewen Callaway
    20 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Donald Johanson reflects on the enduring charisma of the Australopithecus afarensis fossil he found 40 years ago.Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2014.16379
  • Full Episode

    Nature
    Eric R. Olson
    19 Nov 2014 | 8:59 pm
    A shift of power is taking place at the top of the world. The Arctic is undergoing a dramatic change, and with this change one iconic Arctic hunter may soon have to give way to another as solid ice turns to open sea. The polar bear, once king of the North, needs ice to stalk its prey. Killer whales, or orca, on the other hand, are unable to hunt in an ocean locked in ice. As the ice increasingly disappears, the tables have turned. Polar bears are struggling to survive while the now open ocean provides bountiful new hunting grounds for the whales. The post Full Episode appeared first on…
  • Feeding Frenzy Monterey Bay: Anchovies to Whales

    [BWV] Blue Water News
    bluewaterkim
    6 Nov 2014 | 11:47 am
    Once again, “pinheads” what the local fisherman call immature anchovies, have moved close into the Bay attracting an array of predators from brown pelicans to humpback whales.   We thought that perhaps the whales were on their way to the coast of Mainland Mexico where they will give birth and care for their calves before making the journey back to our coast to feed. With these tasty anchovies still around, so are the whales. Enjoy the frenzy while it lasts! http://www.bluewaterventures.org.
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    Nature - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • A global vision

    17 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    A global vision Nature 515, 7527 (2014). doi:10.1038/515311a The International Council for Science needs to define its mission and show its members that it is worth their membership fees.
  • Save the museums

    18 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Save the museums Nature 515, 7527 (2014). doi:10.1038/515311b Italy’s curators must band together to preserve their valuable collections.
  • Data-access practices strengthened

    18 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Data-access practices strengthened Nature 515, 7527 (2014). doi:10.1038/515312a In our continued drive for reproducibility, Nature and the Nature research journals are strengthening our editorial links with the journal Scientific Data and enhancing our data-availability practices. We believe that this initiative will improve support for authors looking for appropriate public repositories for
  • Openness in science is key to keeping public trust

    Mark Yarborough
    18 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Openness in science is key to keeping public trust Nature 515, 7527 (2014). http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/515313a Author: Mark Yarborough Silence stifles progress, says Mark Yarborough. The scientific enterprise needs a transparent culture that actively finds and fixes problems.
  • Photonics: Twisty light sends images across Vienna

    18 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Photonics: Twisty light sends images across Vienna Nature 515, 7527 (2014). doi:10.1038/515314a Beams of light twisted into a corkscrew shape have carried data more than 3 kilometres over Vienna's skyline in an effort to increase the information-carrying capacity of electromagnetic waves.Adding orbital angular momentum (OAM) to laser beams — when fluctuations of light waves are staggered
 
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    Nature

  • Full Episode

    Eric R. Olson
    19 Nov 2014 | 8:59 pm
    A shift of power is taking place at the top of the world. The Arctic is undergoing a dramatic change, and with this change one iconic Arctic hunter may soon have to give way to another as solid ice turns to open sea. The polar bear, once king of the North, needs ice to stalk its prey. Killer whales, or orca, on the other hand, are unable to hunt in an ocean locked in ice. As the ice increasingly disappears, the tables have turned. Polar bears are struggling to survive while the now open ocean provides bountiful new hunting grounds for the whales. The post Full Episode appeared first on…
  • Polar Bears Try to Catch Salmon

    Eric R. Olson
    18 Nov 2014 | 11:23 am
    Polar bears need the ice to hunt and as it vanishes they can no longer reach their traditional prey. With each Arctic summer providing more water and less ice, some polar bears are forced to try their luck with seaweed, birds, and Arctic char, a type of salmon, as they migrate upstream to spawn. Their ability to find food and develop new hunting skills may prove crucial to their survival. The post Polar Bears Try to Catch Salmon appeared first on Nature.
  • Full Episode

    Eric R. Olson
    14 Nov 2014 | 10:52 am
    In the winter of 2006, a strange phenomenon fell upon honeybee hives across the country. Without a trace, millions of bees vanished from their hives, leaving billions of dollars of crops at risk, threatening our food supply. The epidemic set researchers scrambling to discover why honeybees were dying in record numbers – and to stop the epidemic in its tracks before it spread further. The post Full Episode appeared first on Nature.
  • About

    admin
    10 Nov 2014 | 11:17 am
    A shift of power is taking place at the top of the world. The Arctic is undergoing a dramatic change, and with this change one iconic Arctic hunter may soon have to give way to another as solid ice turns to open sea. The polar bear, once king of the North, needs ice to stalk its prey. Killer whales, or orca, on the other hand, are unable to hunt in an ocean locked in ice. As the ice increasingly disappears, the tables have turned. Polar bears are struggling to survive while the now open ocean provides bountiful new hunting grounds for the whales. There appears to be no stopping these…
  • Killer Whales Attack Pod of Narwhal

    admin
    6 Nov 2014 | 2:09 pm
    A group of 20 tagged killer whales traveling at fairly rapid speed is followed as they head straight toward the summer nursery grounds of a pod of narwhal and their young. The science team and film crew are stunned as they arrive to see the killer whales lunging at the beach, pinning the entire pod of narwhal in shallow water before devouring them all. The post Killer Whales Attack Pod of Narwhal appeared first on Nature.
 
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    [BWV] Blue Water News

  • Feeding Frenzy Monterey Bay: Anchovies to Whales

    bluewaterkim
    6 Nov 2014 | 11:47 am
    Once again, “pinheads” what the local fisherman call immature anchovies, have moved close into the Bay attracting an array of predators from brown pelicans to humpback whales.   We thought that perhaps the whales were on their way to the coast of Mainland Mexico where they will give birth and care for their calves before making the journey back to our coast to feed. With these tasty anchovies still around, so are the whales. Enjoy the frenzy while it lasts! http://www.bluewaterventures.org.
  • Sex, Lives and Sea Hares

    bluewaterkim
    3 Nov 2014 | 7:20 pm
  • Baby Humpback Whale Encounter: Tonga

    bluewaterkim
    5 Sep 2014 | 12:28 pm
    Encounter with a Baby Whale There are just a few places in the world where in water encounters with whales are permitted and regulated. In a nation where humpback whales were virtually decimated by a whaling industry just decades ago, their population is slowly recovering. Supporting a local economy through regulated whale swims is helping to preserve a fragile population of whales that spend ‘their winter” in the archipelago kingdom of Tonga. As with all of our encounters, this young and very playful whale initiated the contact with us. It happened repeatedly for well over an…
  • Common Murres and Humpback Whales of Monterey Bay: A Kayak Adventure

    bluewaterkim
    7 Aug 2014 | 7:42 am
    www.bluewaterventures.org. While yesterday’s whale encounters were awesome, there’s so much more to the story right now as species are gorging on the abundant food in Monterey Bay National Marine Sancturay. The young Common Murre chick survived the great plunge perhaps from the cliffs of Devil’s Slide towering 1000 feet over the Pacific. As it glided down and “hit” the water, the father Murre waited patiently for the chick’s first encounter with a salty world. For the next several months, “Dad” and off spring will be an insperable pair as the…
  • Bioluminescence Night Kayaking: Elkhorn Slough

    bluewaterkim
    2 Aug 2014 | 8:36 am
        www.bluewaterventures.org. Bioluminescence Night Kayaking Last night we had an amazing light show during our first of several bioluminescence night paddles in Elkhorn Slough. Before the water began to sparkle with light producing dinoflagellates, sea otters and harbor seals popped up near by. Marine mammal interactions are quite different at night. Many species produced a “cold light”, a chemical reaction that emits sparks of light. Bioluminescence may serve as a warning, a lure, communication or mate selection. As our paddles glided through the water, light exploded…
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    Nature News -- ScienceDaily

  • Darwin 2.0: New theory on speciation, diversity

    20 Nov 2014 | 9:32 am
    It has long been thought that dramatic changes in a landscape like the formation of the Andes Mountain range or the Amazon River is the main driver that initiates species to diverge. However, a recent study shows that speciation occurred much later than these dramatic geographical changes. Researchers have found that time and a species' ability to move play greater parts in the process of speciation.
  • Boosts in productivity of corn and other crops modify Northern Hemisphere carbon dioxide cycle

    19 Nov 2014 | 11:22 am
    In the Northern Hemisphere, there's a strong seasonal cycle of vegetation. Each year in the Northern Hemisphere, levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide drop in the summer as plants "inhale," then climb again as they exhale after the growing season. During the last 50 years, the size of this seasonal swing has increased by as much as half, for reasons that aren't fully understood. Now a team of researchers has shown that agricultural production may generate up to a quarter of the increase in this seasonal carbon cycle, with corn playing a leading role.
  • 'Green Revolution' changes breathing of the biosphere: Stronger seasonal oscillations in carbon dioxide linked to intensive agriculture

    19 Nov 2014 | 10:26 am
    The intense farming practices of the 'Green Revolution' are powerful enough to alter Earth's atmosphere at an ever-increasing rate, boosting the seasonal amplitude in atmospheric carbon dioxide to about 15 percent over the past five decades. That's the key finding of a new atmospheric model, which estimates that on average, the amplitude of the seasonal oscillation of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is increasing at a rate of 0.3 percent every year.
  • 'Aquatic osteoporosis' jellifying lakes

    19 Nov 2014 | 9:54 am
    A plague of “aquatic osteoporosis” is spreading throughout many North American soft-water lakes due to declining calcium levels in the water and hindering the survival of some organisms. The reduced calcium availability is hindering the survival of aquatic organisms with high calcium requirements and promoting the growth of nutrient-poor, jelly-clad animals.
  • Seed dormancy, a property that prevents germination, already existed 360 million years ago

    19 Nov 2014 | 7:19 am
    Scientists have found that seed dormancy (a property that prevents germination under non-favorable conditions) was a feature already present in the first seeds, 360 million years ago.
 
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    NaturalNews.com

  • If Ebola remains in semen of infected men, why were male Ebola victims in US 'cleared' as virus-free?

    20 Nov 2014 | 10:00 pm
    (NaturalNews) An Indian man has been placed under mandatory quarantine in his home country after tests came back positive for the Ebola virus in his semen, according to new reports. The 26-year-old Indian national was hospitalized nearly two months ago in Liberia after contracting...
  • Five seniors die in Georgia care center after receiving flu shot - report

    20 Nov 2014 | 10:00 pm
    (NaturalNews) Healthcare workers at Hope Assisted Living & Memory Care Center in Dacula, Georgia, whose identities have not been made known as of this writing, have informed Health Impact News that on November 7, 2014, five residents of the center received flu vaccinations, only to...
  • Sales of 'active sitting' devices skyrocket

    20 Nov 2014 | 10:00 pm
    (NaturalNews) Active sitting may sound like an oxymoron, but it's a health trend that's fast sweeping through many workplaces in an effort to bolster interest in fitness and increase activity in settings that typically involve high levels of sitting and little physical movement.The...
  • The medical shadow government

    20 Nov 2014 | 10:00 pm
    (NaturalNews) Story by Jon Rappoport, republished from JonRappoport.Wordpress.com.Over the last 50 years, tireless researchers have uncovered and revealed the existence of various elites that control governments and populations:Banks, super-banks, the military...
  • Improve your skin health and avoid skin cancer naturally

    20 Nov 2014 | 10:00 pm
    (NaturalNews) For millions of people, around the world, perfect skin seems like a distant dream. The American Academy of Dermatology reveals that acne affects 40 - 50 million Americans, at a cost of over $2 billion per year. Every year, in the United States, 5 million people are treated...
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    Lifescapes

  • A WILDER ROSE Goes Audio!

    Susan Albert
    16 Nov 2014 | 8:23 am
    The upcoming (March 17) Lake Union reprint edition of A Wilder Rose now has a beautiful new cover! I loved...
  • Time for Time Out

    Susan Albert
    2 Nov 2014 | 7:35 am
    I'm taking a month's working vacation at Coyote Ridge, our log cabin in New Mexico, on the eastern slope of...
  • Works In Progress

    Susan Albert
    5 Oct 2014 | 8:30 am
    My current needlepoint work-in-progress: I'm starting on the borders now. I like it when I get to this stage, because...
  • A Wilder Rose Ebook

    Susan Albert
    30 Sep 2014 | 5:32 am
    If you don't have your copy of the original ebook edition of A Wilder Rose yet, now's the time to...
  • "Light of My Life": ER to Hick

    Susan Albert
    19 Sep 2014 | 9:08 am
    I was delighted last night to see that Ken Burns paid attention to Lorena Hickok in the fifth episode of...
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    Coyote Crossing

  • Last night’s dream, still not completely shaken by Chris Clarke

    Chris Clarke
    13 Nov 2014 | 6:11 pm
    It was bad news from the oncologist. Multiple myeloma, the same as killed my grandfather when he was just two years older than I am now, and I walked the street in a daze at the prognosis. Four months tops, he’d said, and that was after I cajoled him for optimism, talked about outliers and long right-hand tails of bell curves and essays by Stephen J. Gould. Four months. February. She was waiting for me in the park, right where she’d said she’d be when we parted that morning. Behind her a brilliant blaze of California poppies in full orange bloom, a sky uninterrupted by…
  • Found while reading the Draft Desert Renewable Energy Conservation Plan by Chris Clarke

    Chris Clarke
    1 Oct 2014 | 3:30 pm
    “Siting renewable energy only on private land would not provide balance or flexibility in siting renewable energy development because there is limited private land throughout the DRECP Planning Area and the private land does not always correlate with areas with the highest energy resource values. In some instances, development on private land would not align with existing transmission corridors. Meeting statewide and federal renewable energy goals within the DRECP planning area boundary exclusively on private lands would result in substantial conflicts with current and proposed land…
  • What she asked; what I did not say by Chris Clarke

    Chris Clarke
    23 Sep 2014 | 4:48 pm
    thin dark hand on mine nails tracing tendons she looked up. “Why do you like me?” my heart a well, dark bottom unseen. sounds of tossed pebbles fade long before they might surface. now a swift red-tail hawk stripes the bottomless blue sky. her eyes scan each rock shining brilliant dark brown. I would stand with her I would stand with her I would stand with her and fill this void with stones.
  • Heartbreak and Ivanpah; Ivanpah and heartbreak by Chris Clarke

    Chris Clarke
    9 Sep 2014 | 10:54 pm
    Sometimes, reflected glory burns too bright. Sometimes, your feathery integument ignites, and all that’s left: the earth approaching stony swift. Decisions loom, and sad ones; stay the course you set despite the certainty of impact? Veer away from the bright light that’s tempted you this far? There’s no real hope of happy endings here. All that remains: the strain of scorched, dis-feathered wing against the unforgiving air, inevitable contact with the earth, gorge-rising fear, while those below you on the distant ground see nothing but a bright, leisurely arc and slow,…
  • Poem with one vowel by Chris Clarke

    Chris Clarke
    28 Aug 2014 | 5:55 pm
    Edge effectsGlee! The deep freeze recedes.Even the bejeweled bees, ever kept penned,Greet the respected beekeeper.These stretched present vessels, these feeble knees, These leveled, dependent legs,End the secret sense the experts set,The present red-dressed regret.Yes, pen the letters. Send them west, Let sweet green verses rest well there. Let them needle-test the chest-nerves’ senses.
 
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    ARCHEA

  • SEA OTTER: WEST COAST MOMENT

    17 Nov 2014 | 10:58 pm
  • DINOSAUR TRACKWAY: TUMBLER RIDGE

    29 Jul 2014 | 10:18 am
  • SEARCHING THE SKIES

    21 May 2014 | 1:52 pm
  • BRACKET FUNGUS: SUNLIT DROPLETS

    2 May 2014 | 11:48 am
  • WASH THAT FOR YOU MISS?

    30 Mar 2014 | 3:12 am
    If you were a fish living in the warm turquoise waters off the coast of Bonaire, you may not hear those words, but you'd see the shrimp sign language equivalent. It seems Periclimenes yucatanicus or Spotted Cleaner Shrimp is doing a booming business in the local reefs by setting up a fish washing service.That's right, a Fish Wash. You'd be hard pressed to find a terrestrial Molly Maid with two opposable thumbs as studious and hardworking as this wee marine beauty. This quiet marine mogel is turning out to be one of the ocean's top entrepreneurs. Keeping its host and diet clean and green, the…
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    NextNature.net - Nature changes along with us

  • Predator VS Alien

    Hendrik-Jan Grievink
    21 Nov 2014 | 6:30 am
    Your backyard is a dangerous place. Peculiar image of the week.
  • Reinventing Nature with Synthetic Biology

    Alessia Andreotti
    20 Nov 2014 | 7:00 am
    Bioengineer Drew Endy shares his idea of biology as a precision manufacturer that could potentially transform civilization as we know it. “There is this natural technology out there in the wild that is so capable of manufacturing stuff that it coats the surface of the Earth. It takes atoms from the atmosphere and light from the environment and self-assembles huge structures with atomic precision.” According to Endy the only option we have is to embrace a synthetic biological future, to change the way we live, manufacture and consume. “We are destroying environments, we are…
  • High-Tech Cemetery

    Alessia Andreotti
    19 Nov 2014 | 6:44 am
    Japanese people use to turn to technology for solutions to many of the issues of life, and now death too. In Japan, a crowded country with a fast-ageing society, there is a shortage of final resting places, especially in the big cities. With a population expected to shrink by nearly 30 million people over the next 50 years, the funerals and graves market is very alive. The Ruriden cemetery, in Tokyo, is a hi-tech solution – multi-storey graveyards. In this modern memorial building over 2.000 Buddhas statues are illuminated by high-powered color changing LED lights. Visitors are given an…
  • Miracles Happen… Again

    Hendrik-Jan Grievink
    18 Nov 2014 | 6:10 am
    Ever landed in that weird part of the internet where you click your way from alien abduction and ghost appearances to mermaids washed ashore? Think of this napkin sketch.
  • The Carnery – A Cultured Future with In vitro Meat

    NextNature.net
    16 Nov 2014 | 2:00 am
    Imagine London 2025. The first in vitro carnery ‘Counter Culture’ opens its doors. The restored 1970s-era English brewpub boasts an expansive bar of reclaimed mahogany and booths upholstered with magnificent in vitro leather. Steaks are grown to precision inside giant steel vats, decorated (functionally) with illuminated green algae tanks. A disorienting mingling of global spices flavor varieties of exotic and heritage meats like boar and Berkshire, all of which are cultured on site. The large charcuterie board, consisting of mushroom-media duck foie gras, coriander mortadella and crispy…
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    Birding Dude

  • Backyard Bird # 120

    6 Nov 2014 | 6:55 pm
    Dickcissel (center) with House Sparrows and a Red-winged Blackbird.Migration, whether spring or fall, provides a great opportunity to entice birds that you would not ordinarily have in your garden. It has certainly helped to bump the number of bird species observed in the backyard. I have been rather fortunate to record (all with photo documentation) a number of very good birds such as Eastern Meadowlark, Yellow-bellied Flycatcher, Yellow-billed Cuckoo, Hooded Warbler, White-winged Crossbill and Evening Grosbeak to name a few. On November 4th, I recorded number 120 for the list of birds seen…
  • A Tailless DICK in Queens NY

    5 Nov 2014 | 8:51 am
    DICK, in the birdwatching world, is a four letter bird banders code for Dickcissel (Spiza americana). This is not a common bird for us in the NYC metro area and our best shot at finding one is often during the fall migration. It just so happened that I stumbled upon one at Big Egg Marsh in Queens NY on October 28th.This was an interesting looking Dickcissel made so by the fact that it was not well marked and tailless. In studying the plumage, this bird appeared to be a 1st winter Dickcissel. The braces on the back looked pale and the plumage included slight streaks on the chest heading…
  • A Larophile's Delight

    31 Oct 2014 | 5:07 pm
    For anyone who might not be aware who or what is a Larophile, it is one who arguably spends too much of his or her time sifting through flocks of gulls enjoying the challenge of identifying, aging and just studying them. In Queens NY, we have a dearth of locations for good gull congregation and often times I find myself further out east on Long Island in search of a good gathering to comb through.Recently, some sites on Long Island have given birders (those larophile types) a chance at observing the not so common Lesser Black-backed Gull (larus fuscus) in a variety of plumage. I first chanced…
  • Macro Monday

    27 Oct 2014 | 8:43 am
    Today's candidate for Macro Monday is one of the toughest yet that I have encountered, as I could not determine if this was a flower fly of the Syrphus sp. or Eupeodes. I am going with "possible" Syrphus which has several species in North America. They are not only pollinators although not as good as bees since they are almost hairless to carry pollen but they are a Gardner's friend since they feed on aphids when in larvae form. Tags: Macro Monday
  • Worldless Wednesday

    22 Oct 2014 | 8:24 am
    Tags: Wordless Wednesday
 
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    Jim Brandenburg

  • Pic of the Week (November 17, 2014): BW121 Raven in Birch

    17 Nov 2014 | 1:40 am
    "So cool, calm, and collected in the face of the storm."~ DianeRavenwood StudiosBrandenburg GalleryPic of the Week (November 17, 2014): BW121 Raven in BirchPic of the Week features the images of Jim Brandenburg, as selected weekly by his staff. With each selection, we hope to highlight the depth, breadth, and splendor of his work. Pic of the Week Special PricingPurchase this week's Pic (print, matted, or framed - 8x12" or larger) and receive 30% off during the week it is featured (Nov. 17 - Nov. 21)! Contact the Brandenburg Gallery in Ely, Minnesota (877) 493-8017 to take…
  • Brandenburg Prairie Foundation & Give to the Max Day

    13 Nov 2014 | 7:48 am
    Minnesota’s Give to the Max Day is today, Thursday, November 13, 2014! It is the one day that you can help make a difference for many non-profits in Minnesota. We hope you’ll consider giving a tax-deductible donation to the Brandenburg Prairie Foundation. Any amount you can give will help us continue our goal of preserving, expanding and educating people about Minnesota’s native prairies. Sioux quartzite 2014Bison rub at Touch the Sky 2014Glacial scraping on sioux quartzite 2014  We are so proud of our Touch the Sky Prairie, a unit of the Northern Tallgrass Prairie…
  • Pic of the Week (November 7, 2014): IM63 Pine Plantation

    7 Nov 2014 | 4:00 am
                                                                              " sanctuary                                                                            church               …
  • Pic of the Week (November 1, 2014): BW155 Wolf In a Bog"

    1 Nov 2014 | 12:50 am
    You're looking, looking, looking at all the textures, the shapes, the colors, the rugged overwhelming beauty of a bog. Then suddenly you see her, the wolf. She has been watching you the whole time.~ MarciaRavenwood StudiosBrandenburg GalleryPic of the Week (November 1, 2014): BW155 Wolf In a Bog"Pic of the Week features the images of Jim Brandenburg, as selected weekly by his staff. With each selection, we hope to highlight the depth, breadth, and splendor of his work. Pic of the Week Special PricingPurchase this week's Pic (print, matted, or framed - 8x12" or larger) and receive…
  • Pic of the Week (October 24, 2014): Frosty Sedge Meadow, Day 40 "Chased By The Light"

    24 Oct 2014 | 4:30 am
    "The elegantly frosted sedge meadow takes center stage here, but waiting in the background are the golden tamaracks. Tamaracks are deciduous conifers. After their soft green feathery needles emerge in the spring, they spend the summer blending with the rest of the forest. It's only after the maples, birch and aspen have put on their show that the tamaracks take their turn to shine, gracing us with their glorious golden needles. They are the last hurrah of autumn."~ DianeRavenwood StudiosBrandenburg GalleryPic of the Week (October 24, 2014): Frosty Sedge Meadow, Day 40 "Chased By The…
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    The Ohio Nature Blog

  • Amur Leopard - Columbus Zoo

    1 Nov 2014 | 6:30 pm
    Today we made a family trip to the Columbus Zoo.  For me, it was the first in a few months, since we visited the new Africa area.  Being a cold, blustery November day, we checked out the indoor exhibits.  Rarely do we ever go inside the Asia quest area.  To my surprise, we found two Amur leopards (Panthera pardus orientalis) in an area formerly occupied by sun bears.  I wasn't familiar with the leopard species, which is extremely rare in the wild.  According to the World Wildlife Fund, only 30 or so individuals still exist in far east Russia.  They…
  • Natural Play Area - Highbanks Metropark

    26 Oct 2014 | 5:53 pm
    We had fun!  Thank you Columbus Metroparks for creating fun and free places for families to explore.-Tom
  • The Crooked River, Maine

    19 Oct 2014 | 12:29 pm
    Not only does Otisfield Maine have Little Pond, which is the place where I spend most of my photographic time in Maine, but the Crooked River also traverses the town.  At just about a mile down the road, it's a fairly short trip from our typical base of operations there.  This past July, I spent my last few hours wading in the river, which eventually empties into Sebago Lake.  This river even supports a population of the landlocked salmon.After tromping around here for a few hours, including the undergrowth along the edges, I jumped in a car and headed to the airport.
  • Morning at Little Pond Comes Early

    14 Sep 2014 | 5:43 pm
    Let me stress that it's just not early, it's REALLY early.  Sunrise in June occurs as early as 4:58 a.m. To get up to capture the pre-sunrise light, I had to set an alarm for 4:30.  That's pretty darn early for a vacation, but I did wake one morning that early.  Unfortunately, it was cloudy, and the light was flat and gray.  After looking through all my photographs I have taken at Little Pond, I noticed a gaping hole- I had hardly any photos taken in the morning on the pond.  I remedied that with this photo, one of my favorites from this summer.
  • New Series- Summer at Little Pond

    13 Sep 2014 | 6:11 pm
    This summer, we had the opportunity to travel to Little Pond Maine, Megan's parents' home in the woods, twice.  The first trip happened in early June, in time to catch the pink lady slippers in full bloom.  We went back about five weeks later to celebrate Megan's birthday with her three brothers. We also had the opportunity to meet nephew and cousin Duncan for the first time, who traveled with his parents from Denver.I had plenty of time to explore the pond and the woods surrounding it.  Over the next two weeks or so I'll share some of my favorite images from this summer. One…
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    Farmgirl Fare

  • Green Tomato Salsa Relish Recipe: No Sugar, Super Simple, Totally Delicious!

    Farmgirl Susan
    27 Oct 2014 | 8:30 am
    Wondering what to do with green tomatoes? Try my no sugar, super simple, salsa-like green tomato relish. No blanching, peeling, or canning (unless you want to) required.We've already had a couple of light frosts this year, but from the hot and humid weather we've been having lately you'd never guess it was the end of October in Missouri. By the end of the week they're saying it'll dip back down to 30 degrees F, though, and I think I'm ready to focus on the kale and other cool weather greens and finally call an end to tomato season in my kitchen garden.It's become…
  • Recipe: Italian Countryside Raw Tomato Pasta Sauce and a Tomato Growing Report

    Farmgirl Susan
    23 Sep 2014 | 2:45 pm
    This simple and flavorful fresh tomato pasta sauce with basil, capers, and olives lets you escape to the Italian countryside for an end of tomato season celebration (recipe here).Autumn already? Yes, please. The leaves have started to turn here in Missouri, and the oppressive heat and energy-sucking humidity of summer are history (I think). But just because we've already had a few nights down in the low 40s doesn't mean I'm giving up on the heirloom tomatoes and basil in my kitchen garden just yet.As usual, I was late getting most of my tomato plants into the ground this spring, although I…
  • Recipe: Easy Homemade Vegetable Tomato Juice (like V8 Juice, but better)

    Farmgirl Susan
    23 Aug 2014 | 1:31 pm
    Bye bye, V8 juice! This healthy, homemade V4 version will blow you away (recipe here).Wow, it's hot out there. Two weeks in the 90s, blazing sun, and not a drop of rain. I think today it's supposed to hit 99 degrees (Joe won't let me look at the forecast) and stay there into next week. Despite twice daily watering, pretty much everything in my kitchen garden is looking haggard and unhappy. I'm drenched in sweat, and the fields are crunchy and parched. How can it be so dry and humid at the same time?The sheep spend their days camped out in the shade, and the chickens are laying around…
  • Summer Recipe: Savory Tomato, Mozzarella, and Basil Pesto Pie with an Easy Cheesy Biscuit Crust

    Farmgirl Susan
    8 Aug 2014 | 9:35 am
    Scared of pie dough? This easy biscuit crust is perfect for beginners (recipe here).It's become an annual tradition to give this longtime favorite recipe from the Farmgirl Fare recipe archives a little summer shout out. My San Marzano tomatoes are finally starting to ripen and the basil plants are growing like mad; I can't wait to make one of these scrumptious pies. Enjoy!Do tomatoes and basil say summer to you? Do you love pesto and savory pies and melted mozzarella cheese? Then you'll want to celebrate the bounty of summer with this Savory Tomato and Basil Pesto Pie.This is one…
  • Recipe: Make Ahead Antipasto Baguette Sandwiches

    Farmgirl Susan
    1 Jul 2014 | 2:42 pm
    These scrumptious sandwiches, piled high with salami, mozzarella, marinated artichoke hearts, and an easy homemade green olivada, combine the flavors of an Italian antipasto platter in a handy, portable form (recipe here).As we head toward the 4th of July weekend, I thought I'd highlight a few favorites from the Farmgirl Fare recipe archives that are perfect for summer picnics, parties, and backyard get togethers. Enjoy!The only thing better than a big homemade sandwich? One that actually improves in flavor if allowed to sit for a while. Convenient and better tasting? That's my kind of…
 
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    10,000 Birds

  • Wildlife Rehabilitation in Tulsa

    Suzie
    21 Nov 2014 | 4:00 am
    Just returned from an amazing tour of Tulsa … wildlife rehabilitators, fabulous artists, even an NPR interview with Rich Fisher –  all to benefit WING-IT, Tulsa’s dedicated group of rehabbers. I stayed with renowned writer/artist/rehabber Kim Doner (I call her Whirlwind Kim, with good reason), met up with my longtime rehabber pal Leslie Jackson, missed the globetrotting Shan Goshorn by one day, chatted with raptor rehabbers Kathy and Gary Siftar (who I’d known for years but never met in person), and drove around with (and admired the gorgeous photos of) Tulsa…
  • Waterfowl at the Local Water Treatment Plant

    Alfredo Begazo
    20 Nov 2014 | 5:31 am
    As it turned out the month of October brings some of the common migratory waterfowl to our local water treatment plant ponds in Indian River County, Florida. Coots, Blue and Green-winged Teals are staple at the ponds throughout the winter time. Other ducks such as American Wigeons, Northern Pintails, and Northern Shovelers are as common at the ponds as the frequency and duration of each cold front. Visiting the local water treatment plant after a cold front has become a habit for some of the county birders. We never know what is in store for us there. The ponds are good birding spots…
  • So, I’m Writing a Field Guide

    Corey
    20 Nov 2014 | 3:39 am
    Yeah, I’m kind of surprised too. After all, while I like to believe that I am a pretty good bird blogger I’ve never written anything like a field guide. But George Scott at Scott & Nix convinced me that I could do it. I’m not sure where his confidence in me comes from but I have totally bought into it. After all, how do you turn down the opportunity to join the likes of David Allen Sibley and Roger Tory Peterson in writing a field guide? And, no, I don’t have to use my middle name in order to write a field guide. (I asked.) The book I am writing is the New York…
  • This Week in Bird News: Win (Gunnison Sage Grouse), Lose (Bird Flu), or Draw (European Blackbirds)

    Meredith Mann
    19 Nov 2014 | 1:25 pm
    Finally some good-ish news for the Gunnison Sage Grouse: The boomers of the Rocky Mountain states have finally been granted “threatened species” protection. Which means hopefully their plummeting numbers will stabilize and grow. Which also means that Carrie, who took the sausagefest (her words, not mine) picture of Greater Sage Grouse above, would have another chance to capture some hot bird-on-bird action. The United Nations released its new list of protected species as well, adding the Great Bustard along with the Polar Bear and other species. (Better luck next time, African…
  • Peregrine Falcon vs Brown Pelican?

    Larry
    19 Nov 2014 | 10:00 am
    //www.youtube.com/watch?v=-wpM1LwKaak When doing some research for a presentation on cavity nesting birds of Northern California, I came upon a reference titled “Cavity Nesting Birds of North American Forests.”  The book listed the Peregrine Falcon as a cavity nester which I thought was curious. It reads “Although the peregrine falcon is currently considered a cliff-nester, records indicate that it once nested in tree cavities. The peregrine still uses cavities in broken-off trunks in Europe, but the hole-nesting population of America apparently disappeared with the felling…
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    Steve Creek Outdoors

  • Whitetail Deer Behavior Caught On Trail Camera

    Steve Creek
    21 Nov 2014 | 2:07 am
    Sometimes I get lucky and capture something cool on my trail camera. These Whitetail Deer came around often back in October and kept me excited about checking my camera to see what cool deer behavior it had captured. These types of cameras are addicting. Whitetail Deer Behavior On Trail Camera The post Whitetail Deer Behavior Caught On Trail Camera appeared first on Steve Creek Outdoors.
  • Bobcat On Trail Camera

    Steve Creek
    20 Nov 2014 | 4:46 am
    One of the first things I did when I purchased my property here in Arkansas was to place a trail camera behind the cabin near the National Forest. A Black Bear was one of my first visitors. (Black Bear Near My Cabin) I enjoy checking this camera to see what visited my property. I saw a Bobcat pass through one day while I was sitting in the woods behind my cabin. It came within a few steps of me but I didn’t have my camera that day so it was cool to capture one on the trail camera. A Bobcat Passing Through My Property The post Bobcat On Trail Camera appeared first on Steve Creek…
  • Rosie Is Adjusting To The Cabin Life

    Steve Creek
    19 Nov 2014 | 2:57 am
    Several people have asked about Rosie and how she is doing at the cabin. Rosie is such a funny dog. She is brave when it comes to protecting me from people that she doesn’t know but if she hears a mouse, that’s a different story. We have had a small rodent (I think it’s a mouse) trying to get into the cabin at night and it has kept Rosie and I up. I have tried all the tricks I know to get rid of this thing but nothing has worked. I take Rosie on walks around my property but I make sure she stays by my side. She is not liking that she is not allowed to go on hikes in the…
  • My Place In The Ouachita National Forest

    Steve Creek
    18 Nov 2014 | 3:24 am
    I purchased this place back in August and have enjoyed it ever since. The back part of my 3 acres is butted up against the Ouachita National Forest which means that I have miles of National Forest to explore. It was exciting to have a large male Black Bear spend a couple of months around my place back in August and September. I knew this was going to be the place for me after seeing this bear. I have wanted to photograph an Arkansas Black Bear in the wild for years. I hope he comes back and allows me to make some photos of him. I also have watched a Bobcat, Turkeys and I also saw a couple of…
  • Taking A Break From Hiking The Ouachita National Forest

    Steve Creek
    17 Nov 2014 | 3:13 am
    Arkansas Deer gun hunting season is under way so I am taking a break from hiking the Ouachita National Forest near my cabin until December. This is a slow time of year for me when it comes to photographing wildlife. I usually head to the Arkansas River and photograph the American White Pelicans and the Gulls. This year I am wanting to check on new areas here in west-central Arkansas. I have a few friends that are giving me information on Eagles on Lake Ouachita. If you know of a place that you think I would be interested in and you don’t mind sharing with me, please leave a comment…
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    Conservation Jobs

  • Wolverines Face Courtroom Battle

    Alex Taylor
    13 Nov 2014 | 2:10 am
    The wolverine is a rare and elusive species. It thrives in snow-capped mountains of the Northern Hemisphere, and is perfectly adapted to its habitat. It is the largest land-dwelling member of the weasel family and is powerfully built, with dense fur, short legs and wide feet for travelling large distances across the snow. Wolverines once […]
  • The Comeback of the Galapagos Tortoise

    Alex Taylor
    10 Nov 2014 | 2:48 am
    “A true story of success and hope in conservation.” These are the words of the lead author of a new study, reporting on the recovery of a population of endangered giant tortoise on the Galapagos Island of Espanola. For centuries giant tortoises were decimated by whalers who collected them and took them on long voyages […]
  • Vulture Recovery

    Alex Taylor
    29 Oct 2014 | 7:51 am
    As recently as the 1980s, vulture populations across Asia were abundant. The Oriental white-backed vulture was so common in India it was probably the most abundant bird of prey in the world. But then vultures began dying all across India and in neighbouring Pakistan and Nepal. Three species of South Asian vultures faced extinction, and […]
  • Aliens in the Med

    Alex Taylor
    22 Oct 2014 | 2:23 am
    The Mediterranean is a tourist hotspot, with millions of people visiting every year. It is also a hotspot for marine biodiversity and home to over 17,000 species – 20% of which occur nowhere else. But in recent years, aliens have invaded the Mediterranean, and are disrupting the ecosystem’s delicate balance. A multinational team researchers from […]
 
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    Quality Parks Master Naturalists News

  • Proposed Brookhaven Town owned waterfront property transfer to the Village of Port Jefferson

    21 Nov 2014 | 4:53 am
    Early this morning, we came upon this email, from MaryAnn Johnston, ABCO, President, describing a proposed transfer of Brookhaven Town owned waterfront property to the Village of Port Jefferson.  Mindy's own direct experience with waterfront public lands access was with Centennial Park. Centennial Park is tucked away in the eastern corner of the harbor. It is actually owned by Brookhaven Town and leased to the Village of Port Jefferson, and setup as a park by LISEC. In time,  it's parking lot was expanded, and it's access restricted to Port Jefferson residents only.  I…
  • Flyboarding May Come To Port Jefferson

    18 Nov 2014 | 6:22 am
    Scanning the articles we curate for Long Island Environmental News, we came upon this article. It's a story about Flyboarding being banned from a Long Island marina in Riverhead, with the owner saying Port Jefferson would welcome him instead.  Hey, Port Jefferson is home of Quality Parks. Now, we've heard of paddle boarding, a welcome relief to jet skiing, but what is Flyboarding? According to the article referenced below, the company known as FlyBoard Long Island "drew nearly 500 customers to downtown’s Treasure Cove Marina in its inaugural season this year." The…
  • The Souls Of Birds by Nicola Smith of Valley News

    15 Nov 2014 | 4:58 am
    Excerpts  and photography from news story published in the Valley News (http://www.vnews.com)Floyd Scholz, one of the world’s leading bird carvers, lives atop a mountain in Hancock, Vt. Scholz grew up in Fairfield, Conn., in the 1960s and ’70s. Woods and fields were still plentiful, and because the town also sits on Long Island Sound, Scholz saw both waterfowl and woodland birds. Southern Connecticut and the southwestern shore of Long Island also had a tradition of decoy carving, Scholz said.What Scholz does is etch bird behavior into wood. It’s not just a question of…
  • Quality Parks Content Curation Offers Long Island Environmental News To Members

    14 Nov 2014 | 5:15 am
    Content curation, is a new IT term, which means to organize information from many sources. For Quality Parks, it's a terrific opportunity to provide a one stop source of environmental news to Long Island readers. There are a variety of software products offering this ability to design and co-create  content. We are now using Rebel Mouse, which is the free version of Rebel Roar. Quality Parks isn't ready to "roar" just yet.Long Island Environmental News applies the content curation process to pick up trends in how news is generated and how it goes viral. But we also feature stories…
  • Quality Parks Membership Appeal

    10 Nov 2014 | 6:27 am
    As Quality President, Mindy Block is asking you to join us in the fight to protect and care for the public open spaces of Long Island. What Quality Parks offers to the community is a hands on training program that builds professional leadership skills.Pine BarrensThese two pictures  (above and below) were taken in the Pine Barrens. We need to train our citizens how to peacefully sustain and be better stewards. Don't you agree?Brookhaven State ParkQuality Parks - Be Naturally Intelligent™ Quality Parks Master Naturalists go out into the community to help serve the common…
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    Birding Pictures

  • Eurasian Wigeons and American Wigeons: Contentious Cousins

    Lauren Shaffer
    7 Nov 2014 | 5:52 pm
    The Eurasian Wigeon which breeds in Iceland, Europe, and Asia, is a common visitor to America, and is a handsome bird with its rufous head and pinkish breast.  It shares some characteristics with its American cousin, the “Baldpate,” such as the cream-colored crown, white shoulder patch, and black at the back end. As stated in Audubon birds, The Eurasian Wigeon is usually found associating with flocks of its American counterpart. Like the American Wigeon, this species is unorthodox in its feeding habits: It spends much of its time grazing on land like a goose and also loiters…
  • Forster’s Tern

    Lauren Shaffer
    29 Oct 2014 | 7:00 pm
    The Forster’s Tern is a beauty, unique among the terns in winter with its black eye patch rather than a cap or crown. It’s also the only tern which lives almost entirely in North America. On a recent visit to Cape May, NJ, we came upon these beautiful birds vying for a spot on the railing of a dock. Forester’s Terns feed on fish, small crustaceans, frogs, and mollusks. They often hover before plunge-diving into the water after prey. In the East they prefer salt water marshes, and in the West they inhabit mainly fresh water marshes. Winter is spent along the coast south of…
  • Lincoln’s Sparrow

    Lauren Shaffer
    16 Oct 2014 | 6:43 pm
    Lincoln’s sparrows are always a treat to see in fall migration in Pennsylvania.  Their finely streaked sides and breast, along with their buffy malar stripe and upper breast, an eye ring, and white throat and belly all combine to make for one handsome bird. s This fall I discovered some wonderful habitat for migrating sparrows and warblers.  At the bottom of a private lane of a neighbor, where field, prairie (shrubby grassland), and deep woods converge; dozens, if not hundreds of mostly sparrows are often found in the grasses, multiflora rose, and autumn olive. Towhees, Mockingbirds,…
  • Great Blue Heron Juvenile

    Lauren Shaffer
    8 Oct 2014 | 11:24 am
    All About Birds states: Whether poised at a river bend or cruising the coastline with slow, deep wingbeats, the Great Blue Heron is a majestic sight. This stately heron with its subtle blue-gray plumage often stands motionless as it scans for prey or wades belly deep with long, deliberate steps. They may move slowly, but Great Blue Herons can strike like lightning to grab a fish or snap up a gopher. In flight, look for this widespread heron’s tucked-in neck and long legs trailing out behind. Juvenile Great Blue Herons are medium-gray like the adult, but have two-toned bills and a streaked…
  • Great Egret, Bathing Beauty

    Lauren Shaffer
    29 Sep 2014 | 6:41 pm
    All birds bathe in order to maintain their plumage, but when a Great Egret takes a bath, it makes a big splash!  While kayaking this week at Montour Preserve, I noticed a Great Egret at the far end of the lake.  Keeping the sun behind me, I paddled up to a respectable distance from the bird and let the boat slowly drift towards the shore.  He deftly plucked one small fish after another from the shallows, and after downing at least 8 fish, he began to bathe. Down went his head and up went the waves of water! Vigorously he submerged himself and raised his wings till the water rolled off his…
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    BIOZOOM

  • PALAEMON (FRESHWATER PRAWN) APPENDAGES

    21 Nov 2014 | 1:27 am
    Indian River water prawn is called Palaemon'. Marine water prawn is called Penacus'. The body of the prawn is divis­ible into Cephalothorax and abdomen. Cephalothorax is made by 13 segments which includes cephalic and thoracic re­gions. The cephalic region contains 5 segments and thoracic region contains 8 segments. In the abdomen 6 segments are present. The cephalothoracic region is covered by a carapace, k produces anteriorly a rostral spine. In the abdomen the segments are clearly seen. Each seg­ment is covered on dorsal side by a convex tergal plate and a ventral thin sternal…
  • PALAEMON- FRESH WATER PRAWN-STRUCTURE

    20 Nov 2014 | 9:05 pm
    EXTERNAL CHARACTERS OF A FRESH WATER PRAWNS- PALAEMON Palaemon belongs to, Phylum :Arthropoda Sub-Phylum :Mandibulata Clas:Crustacea Sub-Class :Malacostraca Order:Decepoda Introduction:Palaemon is the fresh-water prawn. Palaemon inhabits fresh water streams, rivers, lakes and ponds in India. It prefers clean fresh waters which move, slowly. It remains at the bottom by day, and comes to the surface at night and feeds on algae, moss, small insects and debris. It respires by gills. External Characters :Palaemon shows an elongated body which is spindle like and shows bilateral symmetry. It is 25…
  • ONYCHOPHORA –PERIPATUS-STRUCTURE-AFFINITIES

    19 Nov 2014 | 9:52 pm
    PERIPATUS Peripatus is a soft bodied worm­like, bilaterally symmetrical animal. It shows tracheal mode of respiration. It is grouped in Phylum Arthropoda and Class Onychophora. This class is the smallest and it includes only one genus, and seventy species. Class Onychopora in­cludes primitive worm like, Arthropods. The study of this Class infers the Annelid ancestry of Arthropod, It is a connecting link between annelids and arthropods. Peripatus is seen in neotropical regions like West Indies, America, Congo, Australia, Tasmania, New-Zealand, Malaya etc. It exhibits…
  • PHYLUM ARTHROPODA CHARACTERISTICS- CLASSIFICATION

    17 Nov 2014 | 8:48 am
      GENERAL CHARACTERS OF PHYLUM ARTHROPODA Aristotle described crabs and some decapods. He grouped them as malacostraca in insecta. The name Arthropod means jointed legs. These animals are meteorically segmented, coelomate and triploblastic. It is the largest phylum of Animal kingdom. 1. These animals are multicellular triploblastic, bilaterally symmetrical animals. Some of the anterior segments show cephalization forming a distinct cephalic region. 2. Body is segmented. Segments are limited. Each segment bears a pair of appendages. They are jointed. 3. The body is covered by exoskeleton.
  • BIOLOGY OF ARTHROPODA

    6 Nov 2014 | 10:11 am
    ARTHROPODA-INTRODUCTION "Aristotle" first described crabs and some decapods. He named them as Malacostraca. "Linnaeus" kept Malacostraca under insecta. "Lamarck" divided this insecta into three classes. 1) Crustacea 2) Hexapoda and 3) Arachnida. The name Crustacea was first used by Cuvier. Von Setbold' in 1845 combined Crustacea, Arachnida and Hexapoda into an independent group. He called this group "Arthropoda". Arthropoda means "Jointed legs". This phylum includes animals with jointed legs. These animals are metamerically segmented, true coelomate, and bilaterally symmetrical. This is the…
 
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