Nature

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  • Moon on a stick

    Nature - Issue - nature.com science feeds
    25 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Moon on a stick Nature 515, 7528 (2014). doi:10.1038/515466a A crowdfunded lunar mission might seem like a long shot — but there is no harm in trying.
  • Bullet-proof armour and hydrogen sieve add to graphene’s promise

    NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
    Richard Van Noorden
    26 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    One-atom-thick material blocks 'bullet' strikes but allows protons to pass through.Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2014.16425
  • The Killer Whale’s Killer Weapon–Its Brain

    Nature
    Eric R. Olson
    26 Nov 2014 | 8:23 am
    Contrary to the friendly depictions offered up by ocean theme parks, the killer whale (also known as the orca or blackfish), is the most devastating predator to roam the open oceans. It can weigh up to 11 tons, hit top speeds of 30 miles (48 kilometers) per hour and sports a mouth full of three-inch long interlocking teeth. In addition to these more obvious physical adaptations, the orca’s big brain–the second largest among ocean mammals–endows it with an intelligence unparalleled in an animal of its size. To get a rough sense of animal smarts, scientists look at something…
  • Kayaking with Humpback Whales: Monterey Bay

    [BWV] Blue Water News
    bluewaterkim
    27 Nov 2014 | 6:58 am
    http://www.bluewaterventures.org. Thanksgiving Paddle I am thankful for the amazing gifts of Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary. Humpback whales are still around as well as all the other wonders of the bay. Yesterday, we saw a young male elephant seal “bottling”, a resting position at the surface (not pictured). At first glance from a distance the pointy proboscis had the appearance of a dorsal fin and not that of a cetacean. As we approached, we could then hear the “dorsal fin” breathing and realized it was a pinniped. Elephant Seal sightings from our kayaks are…
  • Unbelievable underworld and its impact on us all

    Nature News -- ScienceDaily
    26 Nov 2014 | 10:27 am
    A new study has pulled together research into the most diverse place on earth to demonstrate how the organisms below-ground could hold the key to understanding how the worlds ecosystems function and how they are responding to climate change.
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    Nature - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Moon on a stick

    25 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Moon on a stick Nature 515, 7528 (2014). doi:10.1038/515466a A crowdfunded lunar mission might seem like a long shot — but there is no harm in trying.
  • Ebola opportunity

    25 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Ebola opportunity Nature 515, 7528 (2014). doi:10.1038/515465b A slowdown in new cases offers a chance for control efforts to get ahead of the epidemic.
  • Haemophilia

    Herb Brody
    25 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Haemophilia Nature. doi:10.1038/515S157a Author: Herb Brody
  • US regulators move on thought-controlled prosthetics

    Sara Reardon
    25 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    US regulators move on thought-controlled prosthetics Nature 515, 7528 (2014). http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/515476a Author: Sara Reardon Robotic limb advances are attracting serious attention from the FDA.
  • Old papers find new life online

    25 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Old papers find new life online Nature 515, 7528 (2014). doi:10.1038/515469f Search engines have revolutionized how scientists find papers — especially articles that have been around for a while. A team of researchers at Google has documented a surge in the citation rate for older papers. The study found that 36% of citations in 2013
 
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    Nature

  • The Killer Whale’s Killer Weapon–Its Brain

    Eric R. Olson
    26 Nov 2014 | 8:23 am
    Contrary to the friendly depictions offered up by ocean theme parks, the killer whale (also known as the orca or blackfish), is the most devastating predator to roam the open oceans. It can weigh up to 11 tons, hit top speeds of 30 miles (48 kilometers) per hour and sports a mouth full of three-inch long interlocking teeth. In addition to these more obvious physical adaptations, the orca’s big brain–the second largest among ocean mammals–endows it with an intelligence unparalleled in an animal of its size. To get a rough sense of animal smarts, scientists look at something…
  • Full Episode

    Eric R. Olson
    19 Nov 2014 | 8:59 pm
    A shift of power is taking place at the top of the world. The Arctic is undergoing a dramatic change, and with this change one iconic Arctic hunter may soon have to give way to another as solid ice turns to open sea. The polar bear, once king of the North, needs ice to stalk its prey. Killer whales, or orca, on the other hand, are unable to hunt in an ocean locked in ice. As the ice increasingly disappears, the tables have turned. Polar bears are struggling to survive while the now open ocean provides bountiful new hunting grounds for the whales. The post Full Episode appeared first on…
  • Polar Bears Try to Catch Salmon

    Eric R. Olson
    18 Nov 2014 | 11:23 am
    Polar bears need the ice to hunt and as it vanishes they can no longer reach their traditional prey. With each Arctic summer providing more water and less ice, some polar bears are forced to try their luck with seaweed, birds, and Arctic char, a type of salmon, as they migrate upstream to spawn. Their ability to find food and develop new hunting skills may prove crucial to their survival. The post Polar Bears Try to Catch Salmon appeared first on Nature.
  • Full Episode

    Eric R. Olson
    14 Nov 2014 | 10:52 am
    In the winter of 2006, a strange phenomenon fell upon honeybee hives across the country. Without a trace, millions of bees vanished from their hives, leaving billions of dollars of crops at risk, threatening our food supply. The epidemic set researchers scrambling to discover why honeybees were dying in record numbers – and to stop the epidemic in its tracks before it spread further. The post Full Episode appeared first on Nature.
  • About

    admin
    10 Nov 2014 | 11:17 am
    A shift of power is taking place at the top of the world. The Arctic is undergoing a dramatic change, and with this change one iconic Arctic hunter may soon have to give way to another as solid ice turns to open sea. The polar bear, once king of the North, needs ice to stalk its prey. Killer whales, or orca, on the other hand, are unable to hunt in an ocean locked in ice. As the ice increasingly disappears, the tables have turned. Polar bears are struggling to survive while the now open ocean provides bountiful new hunting grounds for the whales. There appears to be no stopping these…
 
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    [BWV] Blue Water News

  • Kayaking with Humpback Whales: Monterey Bay

    bluewaterkim
    27 Nov 2014 | 6:58 am
    http://www.bluewaterventures.org. Thanksgiving Paddle I am thankful for the amazing gifts of Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary. Humpback whales are still around as well as all the other wonders of the bay. Yesterday, we saw a young male elephant seal “bottling”, a resting position at the surface (not pictured). At first glance from a distance the pointy proboscis had the appearance of a dorsal fin and not that of a cetacean. As we approached, we could then hear the “dorsal fin” breathing and realized it was a pinniped. Elephant Seal sightings from our kayaks are…
  • White Pelicans of Elkhorn Slough

    bluewaterkim
    23 Nov 2014 | 6:09 pm
    http://www.bluewaterventures.org. Flocks of White Pelicans stole the show today on our Kirby to the Coast kayaking exploration of Elkhorn Slough. Conditions were ideal as an ebb tide carried us effortlessly to the coast winding through an intricate maze of tidal creeks. Unlike the Western Brown Pelicans which are plunge divers, White Pelicans feed by scooping fish with their bIlls.   They are known to work cooperatively together herding fish using their large bodies to form a net. Concentrating the fish within a “net of birds”, they then take turns scooping up a meal. With a…
  • Kayaking with Sea Otters Elkhorn Slough

    bluewaterkim
    22 Nov 2014 | 2:39 pm
      http://www.bluewaterventures.org. Strange Otter Behavior Over the last 20 years of kayaking in Elkhorn Slough, I’ve witnessed an amazing array of species and behaviors. The theme of our tours could be “weird otter behaviors”. They are a constant source of entertainment and intrigue. On Saturday, I observed a female sea otter holding a young harbor seal on her chest. Apparently, she had been “holding” or “holding captive” this young seal for several days. Perhaps this female lost her otter pup and she chose to adopt another pup, just happened to…
  • Feeding Frenzy Monterey Bay: Anchovies to Whales

    bluewaterkim
    6 Nov 2014 | 11:47 am
    Once again, “pinheads” what the local fisherman call immature anchovies, have moved close into the Bay attracting an array of predators from brown pelicans to humpback whales.   We thought that perhaps the whales were on their way to the coast of Mainland Mexico where they will give birth and care for their calves before making the journey back to our coast to feed. With these tasty anchovies still around, so are the whales. Enjoy the frenzy while it lasts! http://www.bluewaterventures.org.
  • Sex, Lives and Sea Hares

    bluewaterkim
    3 Nov 2014 | 7:20 pm
    http://www.bluewaterventures.org.
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    Nature News -- ScienceDaily

  • Unbelievable underworld and its impact on us all

    26 Nov 2014 | 10:27 am
    A new study has pulled together research into the most diverse place on earth to demonstrate how the organisms below-ground could hold the key to understanding how the worlds ecosystems function and how they are responding to climate change.
  • Protecting rainforest through agriculture, forestry

    26 Nov 2014 | 6:42 am
    Conservationists are always looking for ways to halt the pace of deforestation in tropical rainforests. One approach involves recultivating abandoned agricultural land. Working in the mountainous regions of Ecuador, the an international team of researchers found afforestation and intense pasturing to be particularly effective, clearly increasing the environmental and economic value of abandoned farmlands.
  • Hydrothermal settlers: Barnacle holds clues about how climate change is affecting the deep ocean

    26 Nov 2014 | 4:53 am
    The deep ocean seems so remote that it is difficult to imagine any sort of human-generated change making an impact on deep-sea life. It is even more difficult to collect or examine evidence from the deep ocean to determine what those impacts might be. Enter the barnacle; a hard, sessile creature that looks like a tiny volcano and attaches to rocks, boat bottoms, and other hard substrates, where it filters ocean water to feed on tiny organisms. The barnacle holds clues about how climate change is affecting the deep ocean. 
  • Microbial communities for health and environment: Precise measurements of microbial ecosystems

    26 Nov 2014 | 4:50 am
    Biologists have succeeded for the first time in describing the complex relationships within an ecosystem in unprecedented detail. Their model ecosystem was a “biological wastewater treatment plant”. In it live numerous species of bacteria which are involved in the wastewater purification process.
  • Female color perception affects evolution of male plumage in birds

    25 Nov 2014 | 5:58 pm
    The expression of a gene involved in female birds' color vision is linked to the evolution of colorful plumage in males, reports a new study. The findings confirm the essential role of female color perception in mate selection and sexual dimorphism.
 
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    Lifescapes

  • A WILDER ROSE Goes Audio!

    Susan Albert
    16 Nov 2014 | 8:23 am
    The upcoming (March 17) Lake Union reprint edition of A Wilder Rose now has a beautiful new cover! I loved...
  • Time for Time Out

    Susan Albert
    2 Nov 2014 | 7:35 am
    I'm taking a month's working vacation at Coyote Ridge, our log cabin in New Mexico, on the eastern slope of...
  • Works In Progress

    Susan Albert
    5 Oct 2014 | 8:30 am
    My current needlepoint work-in-progress: I'm starting on the borders now. I like it when I get to this stage, because...
  • A Wilder Rose Ebook

    Susan Albert
    30 Sep 2014 | 5:32 am
    If you don't have your copy of the original ebook edition of A Wilder Rose yet, now's the time to...
  • "Light of My Life": ER to Hick

    Susan Albert
    19 Sep 2014 | 9:08 am
    I was delighted last night to see that Ken Burns paid attention to Lorena Hickok in the fifth episode of...
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    Coyote Crossing

  • Decision by Chris Clarke

    Chris Clarke
    23 Nov 2014 | 11:38 pm
    I stood tonight at sundown at the south edge of the Mojave National Preserve after a day spent seeing one wonderful aspect of the Mojave after another and the thought came to me: “I live here.” It’s not the first time I’ve had the thought, but it struck me hard tonight. This late summer I made one of the hardest, most personably frightening decisions I’ve ever made. It felt correct at the time even when I feared its consequences most. Had that decision gone the other way, I realized, I would have had to amend my thought to “I could have lived here.”…
  • Last night’s dream, still not completely shaken by Chris Clarke

    Chris Clarke
    13 Nov 2014 | 6:11 pm
    It was bad news from the oncologist. Multiple myeloma, the same as killed my grandfather when he was just two years older than I am now, and I walked the street in a daze at the prognosis. Four months tops, he’d said, and that was after I cajoled him for optimism, talked about outliers and long right-hand tails of bell curves and essays by Stephen J. Gould. Four months. February. She was waiting for me in the park, right where she’d said she’d be when we parted that morning. Behind her a brilliant blaze of California poppies in full orange bloom, a sky uninterrupted by…
  • Found while reading the Draft Desert Renewable Energy Conservation Plan by Chris Clarke

    Chris Clarke
    1 Oct 2014 | 3:30 pm
    “Siting renewable energy only on private land would not provide balance or flexibility in siting renewable energy development because there is limited private land throughout the DRECP Planning Area and the private land does not always correlate with areas with the highest energy resource values. In some instances, development on private land would not align with existing transmission corridors. Meeting statewide and federal renewable energy goals within the DRECP planning area boundary exclusively on private lands would result in substantial conflicts with current and proposed land…
  • What she asked; what I did not say by Chris Clarke

    Chris Clarke
    23 Sep 2014 | 4:48 pm
    thin dark hand on mine nails tracing tendons she looked up. “Why do you like me?” my heart a well, dark bottom unseen. sounds of tossed pebbles fade long before they might surface. now a swift red-tail hawk stripes the bottomless blue sky. her eyes scan each rock shining brilliant dark brown. I would stand with her I would stand with her I would stand with her and fill this void with stones.
  • Heartbreak and Ivanpah; Ivanpah and heartbreak by Chris Clarke

    Chris Clarke
    9 Sep 2014 | 10:54 pm
    Sometimes, reflected glory burns too bright. Sometimes, your feathery integument ignites, and all that’s left: the earth approaching stony swift. Decisions loom, and sad ones; stay the course you set despite the certainty of impact? Veer away from the bright light that’s tempted you this far? There’s no real hope of happy endings here. All that remains: the strain of scorched, dis-feathered wing against the unforgiving air, inevitable contact with the earth, gorge-rising fear, while those below you on the distant ground see nothing but a bright, leisurely arc and slow,…
 
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    ARCHEA

  • SEA OTTER: WEST COAST MOMENT

    17 Nov 2014 | 10:58 pm
  • DINOSAUR TRACKWAY: TUMBLER RIDGE

    29 Jul 2014 | 10:18 am
  • SEARCHING THE SKIES

    21 May 2014 | 1:52 pm
  • BRACKET FUNGUS: SUNLIT DROPLETS

    2 May 2014 | 11:48 am
  • WASH THAT FOR YOU MISS?

    30 Mar 2014 | 3:12 am
    If you were a fish living in the warm turquoise waters off the coast of Bonaire, you may not hear those words, but you'd see the shrimp sign language equivalent. It seems Periclimenes yucatanicus or Spotted Cleaner Shrimp is doing a booming business in the local reefs by setting up a fish washing service.That's right, a Fish Wash. You'd be hard pressed to find a terrestrial Molly Maid with two opposable thumbs as studious and hardworking as this wee marine beauty. This quiet marine mogel is turning out to be one of the ocean's top entrepreneurs. Keeping its host and diet clean and green, the…
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    NextNature.net - Nature changes along with us

  • Anthropocene Exhibition

    NextNature.net
    27 Nov 2014 | 6:00 am
    Next Nature Network will take part in the Munich Deutsches Museum one year special exhibit on the topic of the Anthropocene. Opening on the 5th of December, the exhibition will visualize the history, present and future of the Anthropocene, as well as the deep inventions of humans into the geo- and biosphere over the last two centuries. Some Next Nature Network projects featured in the expo: Razorius Gilletus, Rayfish Shoes, Space Blanket and recipes from The In Vitro Meat Cookbook, such as Dodo Nuggets, Knitted Meat, Magic Meatballs, Meat Oyster and more. Welcome to the Anthropocene: The…
  • Play Buttons on Paper Magazines

    Arnoud van den Heuvel
    26 Nov 2014 | 12:30 am
    Here’s a way to update the old paper magazine into the digital realm: just add a button! For soup, press play.
  • Listening to Wi-Fi

    NextNature.net
    24 Nov 2014 | 6:46 am
    Modern technologies can give deaf people the ability to hear again. With hearing aid people who lost their hearing can instantly hear the lost sounds again they were missing. Frank Swain was one of these people who retrieved their hearing again, thanks to this. Not only can he hear all the regular sounds around us, but also the invisible Wi-Fi signals. Frank Swain together with sound artist Daniel Jones developed Phantom Terrains. This is an experimental tool which makes Wi-Fi fields audible. If he now walks through a city, he will not only hear the people, the wind, the birds and the cars,…
  • Palm Tree Antenna

    Van Mensvoort
    23 Nov 2014 | 6:59 am
    These next natural palm trees species were spotted near Las Vegas and Hurghada, Egypt. Rest assured tourists don’t want ugly cellphone antennas spoiling their oases: they want an untouched landscape, but with cellphone coverage. In case you know any cellphone tree antenna masts in your environment, use the Next Nature spotting app for iPhone to add them to our collection. The best picture wins a copy of our lustrous Next Nature book!
  • Solaris: Mind-Controlled Magnets

    NextNature.net
    22 Nov 2014 | 7:00 am
    Have you always want to move objects or control machines just by thinking about doing it? Well, I know I have. In the last week we came across a project named Solaris, an installation that gives participants the power to control a pool of ferrofluids (magnetic fluids) with their brainwaves. This project was created in a colaboration between the design group ::vtol:: , the chemist Edward Rakhmanov, the neurophysiologist Alexander Kaplan and the designer Julia Borovaya. Solaris uses a brainwave-reading headpiece to register the brain activity of the participants. The strength and the…
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    Birding Dude

  • Backyard Bird # 120

    6 Nov 2014 | 6:55 pm
    Dickcissel (center) with House Sparrows and a Red-winged Blackbird.Migration, whether spring or fall, provides a great opportunity to entice birds that you would not ordinarily have in your garden. It has certainly helped to bump the number of bird species observed in the backyard. I have been rather fortunate to record (all with photo documentation) a number of very good birds such as Eastern Meadowlark, Yellow-bellied Flycatcher, Yellow-billed Cuckoo, Hooded Warbler, White-winged Crossbill and Evening Grosbeak to name a few. On November 4th, I recorded number 120 for the list of birds seen…
  • A Tailless DICK in Queens NY

    5 Nov 2014 | 8:51 am
    DICK, in the birdwatching world, is a four letter bird banders code for Dickcissel (Spiza americana). This is not a common bird for us in the NYC metro area and our best shot at finding one is often during the fall migration. It just so happened that I stumbled upon one at Big Egg Marsh in Queens NY on October 28th.This was an interesting looking Dickcissel made so by the fact that it was not well marked and tailless. In studying the plumage, this bird appeared to be a 1st winter Dickcissel. The braces on the back looked pale and the plumage included slight streaks on the chest heading…
  • A Larophile's Delight

    31 Oct 2014 | 5:07 pm
    For anyone who might not be aware who or what is a Larophile, it is one who arguably spends too much of his or her time sifting through flocks of gulls enjoying the challenge of identifying, aging and just studying them. In Queens NY, we have a dearth of locations for good gull congregation and often times I find myself further out east on Long Island in search of a good gathering to comb through.Recently, some sites on Long Island have given birders (those larophile types) a chance at observing the not so common Lesser Black-backed Gull (larus fuscus) in a variety of plumage. I first chanced…
  • Macro Monday

    27 Oct 2014 | 8:43 am
    Today's candidate for Macro Monday is one of the toughest yet that I have encountered, as I could not determine if this was a flower fly of the Syrphus sp. or Eupeodes. I am going with "possible" Syrphus which has several species in North America. They are not only pollinators although not as good as bees since they are almost hairless to carry pollen but they are a Gardner's friend since they feed on aphids when in larvae form. Tags: Macro Monday
  • Worldless Wednesday

    22 Oct 2014 | 8:24 am
    Tags: Wordless Wednesday
 
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    Jim Brandenburg

  • Pic of the Week: Frosted Grass Sparkles

    21 Nov 2014 | 9:00 am
     "This is the perfect illustration of mornings this time of year in the north country. These beautiful golden sparkles brought the story of Rumplestiltskin to my mind, the miller's daughter having to spin straw into gold.  That is what has happened here.  Jim has spun frosted grass into translucent gold and silver."~ MarciaBrandenburg GalleryRavenwood StudiosPic of the Week (November 21, 2014): NW679 Frosted Grass SparklesPic of the Week features the images of Jim Brandenburg, as selected weekly by his staff. With each selection, we hope to highlight the depth, breadth, and…
  • Pic of the Week (November 17, 2014): BW121 Raven in Birch

    17 Nov 2014 | 1:40 am
    "So cool, calm, and collected in the face of the storm."~ DianeRavenwood StudiosBrandenburg GalleryPic of the Week (November 17, 2014): BW121 Raven in BirchPic of the Week features the images of Jim Brandenburg, as selected weekly by his staff. With each selection, we hope to highlight the depth, breadth, and splendor of his work. Pic of the Week Special PricingPurchase this week's Pic (print, matted, or framed - 8x12" or larger) and receive 30% off during the week it is featured (Nov. 17 - Nov. 21)! Contact the Brandenburg Gallery in Ely, Minnesota (877) 493-8017 to take…
  • Brandenburg Prairie Foundation & Give to the Max Day

    13 Nov 2014 | 7:48 am
    Minnesota’s Give to the Max Day is today, Thursday, November 13, 2014! It is the one day that you can help make a difference for many non-profits in Minnesota. We hope you’ll consider giving a tax-deductible donation to the Brandenburg Prairie Foundation. Any amount you can give will help us continue our goal of preserving, expanding and educating people about Minnesota’s native prairies. Sioux quartzite 2014Bison rub at Touch the Sky 2014Glacial scraping on sioux quartzite 2014  We are so proud of our Touch the Sky Prairie, a unit of the Northern Tallgrass Prairie…
  • Pic of the Week (November 7, 2014): IM63 Pine Plantation

    7 Nov 2014 | 4:00 am
                                                                              " sanctuary                                                                            church               …
  • Pic of the Week (November 1, 2014): BW155 Wolf In a Bog"

    1 Nov 2014 | 12:50 am
    You're looking, looking, looking at all the textures, the shapes, the colors, the rugged overwhelming beauty of a bog. Then suddenly you see her, the wolf. She has been watching you the whole time.~ MarciaRavenwood StudiosBrandenburg GalleryPic of the Week (November 1, 2014): BW155 Wolf In a Bog"Pic of the Week features the images of Jim Brandenburg, as selected weekly by his staff. With each selection, we hope to highlight the depth, breadth, and splendor of his work. Pic of the Week Special PricingPurchase this week's Pic (print, matted, or framed - 8x12" or larger) and receive…
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    The Ohio Nature Blog

  • Veterans Day at Hoover Dam, Blendon Woods

    22 Nov 2014 | 5:09 pm
    -Tom
  • Amur Leopard - Columbus Zoo

    1 Nov 2014 | 6:30 pm
    Today we made a family trip to the Columbus Zoo.  For me, it was the first in a few months, since we visited the new Africa area.  Being a cold, blustery November day, we checked out the indoor exhibits.  Rarely do we ever go inside the Asia quest area.  To my surprise, we found two Amur leopards (Panthera pardus orientalis) in an area formerly occupied by sun bears.  I wasn't familiar with the leopard species, which is extremely rare in the wild.  According to the World Wildlife Fund, only 30 or so individuals still exist in far east Russia.  They…
  • Natural Play Area - Highbanks Metropark

    26 Oct 2014 | 5:53 pm
    We had fun!  Thank you Columbus Metroparks for creating fun and free places for families to explore.-Tom
  • The Crooked River, Maine

    19 Oct 2014 | 12:29 pm
    Not only does Otisfield Maine have Little Pond, which is the place where I spend most of my photographic time in Maine, but the Crooked River also traverses the town.  At just about a mile down the road, it's a fairly short trip from our typical base of operations there.  This past July, I spent my last few hours wading in the river, which eventually empties into Sebago Lake.  This river even supports a population of the landlocked salmon.After tromping around here for a few hours, including the undergrowth along the edges, I jumped in a car and headed to the airport.
  • Morning at Little Pond Comes Early

    14 Sep 2014 | 5:43 pm
    Let me stress that it's just not early, it's REALLY early.  Sunrise in June occurs as early as 4:58 a.m. To get up to capture the pre-sunrise light, I had to set an alarm for 4:30.  That's pretty darn early for a vacation, but I did wake one morning that early.  Unfortunately, it was cloudy, and the light was flat and gray.  After looking through all my photographs I have taken at Little Pond, I noticed a gaping hole- I had hardly any photos taken in the morning on the pond.  I remedied that with this photo, one of my favorites from this summer.
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    Farmgirl Fare

  • Recipe: Quick and Easy (and Healthy!) Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Lemon and Parmesan

    Farmgirl Susan
    25 Nov 2014 | 12:44 pm
    Need a last-minute vegetable dish for your holiday table? These popular Quick & Easy Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Lemon and Parmesan are a scrumptious solution (recipe here).Do you have any plans for Thanksgiving? Joe's brother is arriving from out of town tonight in time for a dinner of freshly ground venison burgers on homemade Farmhouse White buns, and on Thursday we're all going to our friends' house down the road for a big feast, an all-day homemade candy buffet (peanut brittle! fudge! divinity!), lots of laughs, and possibly a team Scrabble tournament. Last year we got there…
  • Green Tomato Salsa Relish Recipe: No Sugar, Super Simple, Totally Delicious!

    Farmgirl Susan
    27 Oct 2014 | 8:30 am
    Wondering what to do with green tomatoes? Try my no sugar, super simple, salsa-like green tomato relish. No blanching, peeling, or canning (unless you want to) required.We've already had a couple of light frosts this year, but from the hot and humid weather we've been having lately you'd never guess it was the end of October in Missouri. By the end of the week they're saying it'll dip back down to 30 degrees F, though, and I think I'm ready to focus on the kale and other cool weather greens and finally call an end to tomato season in my kitchen garden.It's become…
  • Recipe: Italian Countryside Raw Tomato Pasta Sauce and a Tomato Growing Report

    Farmgirl Susan
    23 Sep 2014 | 2:45 pm
    This simple and flavorful fresh tomato pasta sauce with basil, capers, and olives lets you escape to the Italian countryside for an end of tomato season celebration (recipe here).Autumn already? Yes, please. The leaves have started to turn here in Missouri, and the oppressive heat and energy-sucking humidity of summer are history (I think). But just because we've already had a few nights down in the low 40s doesn't mean I'm giving up on the heirloom tomatoes and basil in my kitchen garden just yet.As usual, I was late getting most of my tomato plants into the ground this spring, although I…
  • Recipe: Easy Homemade Vegetable Tomato Juice (like V8 Juice, but better)

    Farmgirl Susan
    23 Aug 2014 | 1:31 pm
    Bye bye, V8 juice! This healthy, homemade V4 version will blow you away (recipe here).Wow, it's hot out there. Two weeks in the 90s, blazing sun, and not a drop of rain. I think today it's supposed to hit 99 degrees (Joe won't let me look at the forecast) and stay there into next week. Despite twice daily watering, pretty much everything in my kitchen garden is looking haggard and unhappy. I'm drenched in sweat, and the fields are crunchy and parched. How can it be so dry and humid at the same time?The sheep spend their days camped out in the shade, and the chickens are laying around…
  • Summer Recipe: Savory Tomato, Mozzarella, and Basil Pesto Pie with an Easy Cheesy Biscuit Crust

    Farmgirl Susan
    8 Aug 2014 | 9:35 am
    Scared of pie dough? This easy biscuit crust is perfect for beginners (recipe here).It's become an annual tradition to give this longtime favorite recipe from the Farmgirl Fare recipe archives a little summer shout out. My San Marzano tomatoes are finally starting to ripen and the basil plants are growing like mad; I can't wait to make one of these scrumptious pies. Enjoy!Do tomatoes and basil say summer to you? Do you love pesto and savory pies and melted mozzarella cheese? Then you'll want to celebrate the bounty of summer with this Savory Tomato and Basil Pesto Pie.This is one…
 
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    10,000 Birds

  • Thrilling Turkey Facts

    Mike
    27 Nov 2014 | 6:10 am
    Another year, another (American) Thanksgiving. Time to trot out the turkey facts! This day of thanks is, after all, known as Turkey Day. Please enjoy this 10,000 Birds tradition and enjoy everything you are thankful for this year… An overwhelming majority of turkeys polled feel that Thanksgiving is not actually Turkey Day. In fact, it seems a lot more like Anti-Turkey Day. Yes, the Wild Turkey is North America’s largest game bird. However, Meleagris gallopavo has a lot more going for it than tasty, tryptophan-laced flesh: Turkeys are social birds and in winter often separate into…
  • Critically Endangered: Sociable Lapwing

    Dragan
    27 Nov 2014 | 4:00 am
    Gujarat, December 2010 Target for today: critically endangered Sociable Lapwing (Vanellus gregarius). The official definition of CR status says the species could be gone within ten years, or could lose 80 per cent of its population within three generations – whichever comes first. CR being the highest category in the Red List, if I want to see some of those birds, I better hurry! In an open Maruti Gypsy, we are heading north from Dasada in the Little Rann of Kutch, Gujarat, along a rather decent tarmac road, between the wheat fields and passing camel carts. Ubiquitous Indian Roller (above)…
  • Henslow’s Sparrow at Jacob Riis Park, Queens, New York

    Corey
    26 Nov 2014 | 3:30 pm
    We were at Flushing Meadows-Corona Park in central Queens on Sunday afternoon. We being me, Daisy, and Desi, having a grand old time watching Desi play with the remote control car he got for his birthday, the remote control airplane having crashed and been temporarily put out of service on its maiden flight. Desi was running around like crazy chasing the car which he was controlling and finding it hilarious when he managed to crash it into either of his parents’ feet. Then my phone rang. It was Tom Burke. He was with some other birders at Jacob Riis Park, out on the barrier beaches of…
  • Sooty Terns are Very Loud

    Duncan
    26 Nov 2014 | 4:00 am
    I’m not quite sure why I started thinking about Sooty Terns today, but once I did couldn’t get them out of my mind so I may as well harness that and do a post on them. They are, I think, the most numerous species of seabird in the tropical Pacific I haven’t done a post on yet. If not, then certainly the loudest. Their name in Hawaiian is ewa ewa, literally “cacophony”, and another name for the species is wideawake tern, which is how they’ll leave you at first. They manage this noise not only through individual effort but their habit of breeding in dense,…
  • The Plateau Effect

    Felonious Jive
    25 Nov 2014 | 4:00 am
    Birders can often be predictable. For example, even though you know I am The Greatest Ornithologist, it would surprise none of you to know that I still grind my teeth and frequently break into sweats because I was not able to go chase the Olive-backed Pipit found last month in southern California (a state record). When a friend of mine told me he saw the pipit from 20 feet away, I responded by telling him to “eat sh*t and die”. But let’s face it….it’s not difficult to deduce that many birders in the state feel exactly how I feel about this subject. But as with…
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    Steve Creek Outdoors

  • Whitetail Deer Behavior Caught On Trail Camera

    Steve Creek
    21 Nov 2014 | 2:07 am
    Sometimes I get lucky and capture something cool on my trail camera. These Whitetail Deer came around often back in October and kept me excited about checking my camera to see what cool deer behavior it had captured. These types of cameras are addicting. Whitetail Deer Behavior On Trail Camera The post Whitetail Deer Behavior Caught On Trail Camera appeared first on Steve Creek Outdoors.
  • Bobcat On Trail Camera

    Steve Creek
    20 Nov 2014 | 4:46 am
    One of the first things I did when I purchased my property here in Arkansas was to place a trail camera behind the cabin near the National Forest. A Black Bear was one of my first visitors. (Black Bear Near My Cabin) I enjoy checking this camera to see what visited my property. I saw a Bobcat pass through one day while I was sitting in the woods behind my cabin. It came within a few steps of me but I didn’t have my camera that day so it was cool to capture one on the trail camera. A Bobcat Passing Through My Property The post Bobcat On Trail Camera appeared first on Steve Creek…
  • Rosie Is Adjusting To The Cabin Life

    Steve Creek
    19 Nov 2014 | 2:57 am
    Several people have asked about Rosie and how she is doing at the cabin. Rosie is such a funny dog. She is brave when it comes to protecting me from people that she doesn’t know but if she hears a mouse, that’s a different story. We have had a small rodent (I think it’s a mouse) trying to get into the cabin at night and it has kept Rosie and I up. I have tried all the tricks I know to get rid of this thing but nothing has worked. I take Rosie on walks around my property but I make sure she stays by my side. She is not liking that she is not allowed to go on hikes in the…
  • My Place In The Ouachita National Forest

    Steve Creek
    18 Nov 2014 | 3:24 am
    I purchased this place back in August and have enjoyed it ever since. The back part of my 3 acres is butted up against the Ouachita National Forest which means that I have miles of National Forest to explore. It was exciting to have a large male Black Bear spend a couple of months around my place back in August and September. I knew this was going to be the place for me after seeing this bear. I have wanted to photograph an Arkansas Black Bear in the wild for years. I hope he comes back and allows me to make some photos of him. I also have watched a Bobcat, Turkeys and I also saw a couple of…
  • Taking A Break From Hiking The Ouachita National Forest

    Steve Creek
    17 Nov 2014 | 3:13 am
    Arkansas Deer gun hunting season is under way so I am taking a break from hiking the Ouachita National Forest near my cabin until December. This is a slow time of year for me when it comes to photographing wildlife. I usually head to the Arkansas River and photograph the American White Pelicans and the Gulls. This year I am wanting to check on new areas here in west-central Arkansas. I have a few friends that are giving me information on Eagles on Lake Ouachita. If you know of a place that you think I would be interested in and you don’t mind sharing with me, please leave a comment…
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    Conservation Jobs

  • The Forest Gardeners of Madagascar

    Alex Taylor
    24 Nov 2014 | 1:06 am
    Madagascar is an island renowned for its lemurs. One hundred and one species can be found there, having evolved in isolation and radiated into virtually all of the island’s ecosystems, free from competition or predation. Sadly, every species of lemur is threatened with extinction, mainly due to habitat destruction and hunting. It is now thought […]
  • Wolverines Face Courtroom Battle

    Alex Taylor
    13 Nov 2014 | 2:10 am
    The wolverine is a rare and elusive species. It thrives in snow-capped mountains of the Northern Hemisphere, and is perfectly adapted to its habitat. It is the largest land-dwelling member of the weasel family and is powerfully built, with dense fur, short legs and wide feet for travelling large distances across the snow. Wolverines once […]
  • The Comeback of the Galapagos Tortoise

    Alex Taylor
    10 Nov 2014 | 2:48 am
    “A true story of success and hope in conservation.” These are the words of the lead author of a new study, reporting on the recovery of a population of endangered giant tortoise on the Galapagos Island of Espanola. For centuries giant tortoises were decimated by whalers who collected them and took them on long voyages […]
  • Vulture Recovery

    Alex Taylor
    29 Oct 2014 | 7:51 am
    As recently as the 1980s, vulture populations across Asia were abundant. The Oriental white-backed vulture was so common in India it was probably the most abundant bird of prey in the world. But then vultures began dying all across India and in neighbouring Pakistan and Nepal. Three species of South Asian vultures faced extinction, and […]
 
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    Long Island Environmental News & Quality Parks Master Naturalist News

  • Indian Island/Terry's Creek Tidal Wetland Restoration - Negative Declaration

    26 Nov 2014 | 6:16 am
    ENB - Region 1 Notices 11/5/2014 - Negative Declaration"Suffolk County - Suffolk County, as lead agency, has determined that the proposed Indian Island/Terry's Creek Tidal Wetland Restoration will not have a significant adverse environmental impact. The action involves a New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYS DEC) Water Quality Improvement Grant funded project to restore approximately 10 acres of salt marsh which was used in the 1960-1970's as a disposal site for material dredged from Terry Creek.""The project seeks to remove spoil and dispose of it off-site at a NYS DEC…
  • Proposed Brookhaven Town owned waterfront property transfer to the Village of Port Jefferson

    21 Nov 2014 | 4:53 am
    Early this morning, we came upon this email, from MaryAnn Johnston, ABCO, President, describing a proposed transfer of Brookhaven Town owned waterfront property to the Village of Port Jefferson.  Mindy's own direct experience with waterfront public lands access was with Centennial Park. Centennial Park is tucked away in the eastern corner of the harbor. It is actually owned by Brookhaven Town and leased to the Village of Port Jefferson, and setup as a park by LISEC. In time,  it's parking lot was expanded, and it's access restricted to Port Jefferson residents only.  I…
  • Flyboarding May Come To Port Jefferson

    18 Nov 2014 | 6:22 am
    Scanning the articles we curate for Long Island Environmental News, we came upon this article. It's a story about Flyboarding being banned from a Long Island marina in Riverhead, with the owner saying Port Jefferson would welcome him instead.  Hey, Port Jefferson is home of Quality Parks. Now, we've heard of paddle boarding, a welcome relief to jet skiing, but what is Flyboarding? According to the article referenced below, the company known as FlyBoard Long Island "drew nearly 500 customers to downtown’s Treasure Cove Marina in its inaugural season this year." The…
  • The Souls Of Birds by Nicola Smith of Valley News

    15 Nov 2014 | 4:58 am
    Excerpts  and photography from news story published in the Valley News (http://www.vnews.com)Floyd Scholz, one of the world’s leading bird carvers, lives atop a mountain in Hancock, Vt. Scholz grew up in Fairfield, Conn., in the 1960s and ’70s. Woods and fields were still plentiful, and because the town also sits on Long Island Sound, Scholz saw both waterfowl and woodland birds. Southern Connecticut and the southwestern shore of Long Island also had a tradition of decoy carving, Scholz said.What Scholz does is etch bird behavior into wood. It’s not just a question of…
  • Quality Parks Content Curation Offers Long Island Environmental News To Members

    14 Nov 2014 | 5:15 am
    Content curation, is a new IT term, which means to organize information from many sources. For Quality Parks, it's a terrific opportunity to provide a one stop source of environmental news to Long Island readers. There are a variety of software products offering this ability to design and co-create  content. We are now using Rebel Mouse, which is the free version of Rebel Roar. Quality Parks isn't ready to "roar" just yet.Long Island Environmental News applies the content curation process to pick up trends in how news is generated and how it goes viral. But we also feature stories…
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    Birding Pictures

  • Eurasian Wigeons and American Wigeons: Contentious Cousins

    Lauren Shaffer
    7 Nov 2014 | 5:52 pm
    The Eurasian Wigeon which breeds in Iceland, Europe, and Asia, is a common visitor to America, and is a handsome bird with its rufous head and pinkish breast.  It shares some characteristics with its American cousin, the “Baldpate,” such as the cream-colored crown, white shoulder patch, and black at the back end. As stated in Audubon birds, The Eurasian Wigeon is usually found associating with flocks of its American counterpart. Like the American Wigeon, this species is unorthodox in its feeding habits: It spends much of its time grazing on land like a goose and also loiters…
  • Forster’s Tern

    Lauren Shaffer
    29 Oct 2014 | 7:00 pm
    The Forster’s Tern is a beauty, unique among the terns in winter with its black eye patch rather than a cap or crown. It’s also the only tern which lives almost entirely in North America. On a recent visit to Cape May, NJ, we came upon these beautiful birds vying for a spot on the railing of a dock. Forester’s Terns feed on fish, small crustaceans, frogs, and mollusks. They often hover before plunge-diving into the water after prey. In the East they prefer salt water marshes, and in the West they inhabit mainly fresh water marshes. Winter is spent along the coast south of…
  • Lincoln’s Sparrow

    Lauren Shaffer
    16 Oct 2014 | 6:43 pm
    Lincoln’s sparrows are always a treat to see in fall migration in Pennsylvania.  Their finely streaked sides and breast, along with their buffy malar stripe and upper breast, an eye ring, and white throat and belly all combine to make for one handsome bird. s This fall I discovered some wonderful habitat for migrating sparrows and warblers.  At the bottom of a private lane of a neighbor, where field, prairie (shrubby grassland), and deep woods converge; dozens, if not hundreds of mostly sparrows are often found in the grasses, multiflora rose, and autumn olive. Towhees, Mockingbirds,…
  • Great Blue Heron Juvenile

    Lauren Shaffer
    8 Oct 2014 | 11:24 am
    All About Birds states: Whether poised at a river bend or cruising the coastline with slow, deep wingbeats, the Great Blue Heron is a majestic sight. This stately heron with its subtle blue-gray plumage often stands motionless as it scans for prey or wades belly deep with long, deliberate steps. They may move slowly, but Great Blue Herons can strike like lightning to grab a fish or snap up a gopher. In flight, look for this widespread heron’s tucked-in neck and long legs trailing out behind. Juvenile Great Blue Herons are medium-gray like the adult, but have two-toned bills and a streaked…
  • Great Egret, Bathing Beauty

    Lauren Shaffer
    29 Sep 2014 | 6:41 pm
    All birds bathe in order to maintain their plumage, but when a Great Egret takes a bath, it makes a big splash!  While kayaking this week at Montour Preserve, I noticed a Great Egret at the far end of the lake.  Keeping the sun behind me, I paddled up to a respectable distance from the bird and let the boat slowly drift towards the shore.  He deftly plucked one small fish after another from the shallows, and after downing at least 8 fish, he began to bathe. Down went his head and up went the waves of water! Vigorously he submerged himself and raised his wings till the water rolled off his…
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    BIOZOOM

  • PALAEMON (PRAWN)-EXCRETORY SYSTEM

    26 Nov 2014 | 7:10 am
    Palaemon excretory system con­tains a pair of kidneys called the antennary or green glands and a median sac called renal sac. I. Antennary glands: The antennary glands are present in the coxae of the antennae. Each gland is small, and white in color. Each gland shows three parts. 1. End - sac. 2. Labyrinth, and 3. Bladder. 1) End - sac :-It is small. It is the central part of the antennary gland. Its wall is folded inside. It has ephithelium and outer connective tissue. The cavity of the end-sac contains a large lacuna. It opens into the labyrinth by a pore. 2) Labyrinth : It is larger…
  • PALAEMON-(PRAWN)- NERVOUS SYSTEM-SENSE ORGANS

    25 Nov 2014 | 1:29 am
    The nervous system of Palaemon resembles that of annelidas, it shows 1. Central nervous system. 2. Peripheral nervous system, and 3. Autonomic nervous system. 1. Central nervous system: It includes a pair of cerebral ganglia, a pair of circum esophageal connectives and a double ventral nerve cord. i) Cerebral ganglia They lie in front of the junction of the oesophagus with the cardiac stomach. It is a white bilobed mass. It is also called brain. ii) Circum oesophageal connectives These are nerve cords which originate from the postero-lateral parts of the brain, run downwards round the…
  • PALAEMON- RESPIRATORY SYSTEM

    24 Nov 2014 | 1:30 am
    Palaemon is a fresh water Prawn. It performs respiration by 3 organs. 1. Gills or Branchiae 2. Epipodites 3. Lining of branchiostegites 1. Gills or Branchiae : There are eight pairs of gills. They show semi-lunar shape. They are arranged vertically one, behind the other in a row. The third pair of gills are the smallest. The gills are attached by their middle part to the body, which is called root. According to their attachment three types of gills are seen in Palaemon. i) Podo branches : The gills are attached to podomere. Ex : The first pair of gills are attached to the coxae of the second…
  • PALAEMON- (PRAWN) BLOOD VASCULAR SYSTEM

    23 Nov 2014 | 6:02 am
    PALAEMON-CIRCULATORY SYSTEM In Palaemon the circulatory system includes blood, dorsal sinus, heart, blood vessels, blood sinuses, blood channels. The circulatory system is open type. The arteries open into blood sinuses in the body. Blood: 1. It is colorless watery fluid. 2. It contains amoeboid cells. 3. The respiratory pigments is haemocyanin, hence the blood is bright blue in color when combined with oxygen. It is colorless when de-oxygenated. 4. Blood distributes digested food, oxygen to all body parts. 5. Blood has the capacity of clotting. Dorsal sinus: The heart is dorsally placed in…
  • PALAEMON (PRAWN) DIGESTIVE SYSTEM

    22 Nov 2014 | 10:36 pm
    Palaemon's digestive system con­tains a long alimentary canal and large hepatopancreatic gland. I. Alimentary canal: The alimentary canal is a long tube. It starts at the mouth and ends with anus. It shows buccal cavity, oesophagus, stomach intestine and rectum. The buccal cavity, oesophagus and stomach are lined with euncle. It is called stomodaeum or fore-gut. Intestine is lined by endoderm and is called mesenteron or mid-gut. The rectum is lined by cuticle and is called the proctodeam or hind gut. a) Mouth: The mouth is a longitudinal slit on the ventral side of the head. It shows…
 
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