Nature

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  • Hummingbird Builds Tiny Nest

    Nature
    Eric R. Olson
    20 Mar 2015 | 11:11 am
    A female Anna’s hummingbird builds a nest constructed of plant fibers and spiderwebs. Just the right size for her tiny eggs. The post Hummingbird Builds Tiny Nest appeared first on Nature.
  • Communication breakdown

    Nature - Issue - nature.com science feeds
    31 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Communication breakdown Nature 520, 7545 (2015). doi:10.1038/520005a A policy change that could discourage UK government scientists from talking to the media is a backwards step. All researchers need to speak up to put science on the political agenda.
  • Stopping deforestation: Battle for the Amazon

    NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
    Jeff Tollefson
    31 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Brazil has waged a successful war on tropical deforestation, and other countries are trying to follow its lead. But victory remains fragile.Nature 520 20 doi: 10.1038/520020a
  • About

    Nature
    Eric R. Olson
    25 Mar 2015 | 11:33 am
    Representing the meticulous and ambitious work of an all-Chinese film company led by award-winning filmmaker, Xi Zhinong, this spectacular film is the true story of a family of Yunnan snub-nosed monkeys living in the highest forests in the world. Only recently discovered, snub-nosed monkeys are hauntingly beautiful primates, different and gentler than others of their kind. Elfin-like, they seem both childlike and wise beyond their years. The family is led by a formidable fighter and his fighting force who guard a troop of 8-10 families. This is a unique monkey society, formed in response to…
  • Man in The Gray Suit

    [BWV] Blue Water News
    bluewaterkim
    8 Mar 2015 | 6:54 pm
    http://www.bluewaterventures.org. A budding shark enthusiast, a mere 10 years of age and part of my Marine Science Camp excitedly shared a memorable factoid with me a few years ago. “Ya know Kim, you are more likely to die from a toilet seat whirling through the air than a shark”. I suppose this fact may be true if you reside in Kansas but not if you kayak the open coast of Central California from Davenport to Santa Cruz. Today we set off on such an adventure, part of a staff enrichment paddle with Blue Water Ventures. Armed with a marine radio, compass, extra fleece and a cell phone, 3…
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    Nature - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Communication breakdown

    31 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Communication breakdown Nature 520, 7545 (2015). doi:10.1038/520005a A policy change that could discourage UK government scientists from talking to the media is a backwards step. All researchers need to speak up to put science on the political agenda.
  • Tree cheers

    31 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Tree cheers Nature 520, 7545 (2015). doi:10.1038/520005b The world must follow Brazil’s lead and do more to protect and restore forests.
  • Walking 2.0

    31 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Walking 2.0 Nature 520, 7545 (2015). doi:10.1038/520006a A passive device that augments calf muscles improves on natural selection’s best effort.
  • Change the cancer conversation

    Colin Macilwain
    31 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Change the cancer conversation Nature 520, 7545 (2015). http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/520007a Author: Colin Macilwain The 'war on cancer' has run off course. Efforts must refocus on the best interests of patients, says Colin Macilwain.
  • Human evolution: Neanderthal freed from stone

    31 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Human evolution: Neanderthal freed from stone Nature 520, 7545 (2015). doi:10.1038/520008a A complete skeleton embedded in an Italian cave is that of an early Neanderthal.Discovered in 1993 near Altamura in southern Italy, the remains (pictured) are coated in a thick layer of calcite, and the bones have been examined only while embedded. A team led
 
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    Nature

  • About

    Eric R. Olson
    25 Mar 2015 | 11:33 am
    Representing the meticulous and ambitious work of an all-Chinese film company led by award-winning filmmaker, Xi Zhinong, this spectacular film is the true story of a family of Yunnan snub-nosed monkeys living in the highest forests in the world. Only recently discovered, snub-nosed monkeys are hauntingly beautiful primates, different and gentler than others of their kind. Elfin-like, they seem both childlike and wise beyond their years. The family is led by a formidable fighter and his fighting force who guard a troop of 8-10 families. This is a unique monkey society, formed in response to…
  • Share Your Photos of Animal Homes

    Eric R. Olson
    24 Mar 2015 | 2:42 pm
    Animal Homes Animal HomesHey amateur nature photographers! Do you have a fun or interesting photo of an animal home? It could be anything from a bird's nest you snapped in your own backyard to a fort that you built for your favorite pet. Submit your photos here! A select few will be shared with NATURE's 250,000+ Facebook fans. Submit Your Photo * requiredFirst Name *Last Name *Email *City Add a video link (YouTube / Vimeo)Photo (.jpg only)Enter your story here (minimum 20 words; maximum 600 words) * I agree to the submission terms and conditionsBy submitting any a photo or any other materials…
  • Hummingbird Builds Tiny Nest

    Eric R. Olson
    20 Mar 2015 | 11:11 am
    A female Anna’s hummingbird builds a nest constructed of plant fibers and spiderwebs. Just the right size for her tiny eggs. The post Hummingbird Builds Tiny Nest appeared first on Nature.
  • About

    Eric R. Olson
    18 Mar 2015 | 10:41 am
    Animal Homes airs on three consecutive Wednesdays, April 8, 15 and 22, 2015 at 8 p.m. (ET) on PBS (check local listings). The three-part series provides intimate, never-before-seen views of the lives of animals in their homes Animals, like humans, need a place they can call home to provide a safe and stable place to raise a family, but they go about building it in entirely different ways. Whether it is a bird’s nest, bear den, beaver lodge or spider web, these are homes of great complexity, constructed from a wide range of natural as well as man-made materials. This three-part series…
  • Full Episode

    admin
    25 Feb 2015 | 8:59 pm
    Ecologist Chris Morgan travels to the jungles of Northern Sumatra to document the work being done to save its population of wild orangutans. Asia’s most intelligent ape once roamed across the Indonesian islands of Sumatra and Java, but today, fewer than 7,000 Sumatran orangutans remain in the wild. The film cites rapid deforestation — clearing the land for vast palm oil plantations — as the chief reason for the species’ declining population. But as Morgan shows, conservationists are trying to reverse that trend by teaching orphaned orangs the survival skills they’ll need for release…
 
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    [BWV] Blue Water News

  • Man in The Gray Suit

    bluewaterkim
    8 Mar 2015 | 6:54 pm
    http://www.bluewaterventures.org. A budding shark enthusiast, a mere 10 years of age and part of my Marine Science Camp excitedly shared a memorable factoid with me a few years ago. “Ya know Kim, you are more likely to die from a toilet seat whirling through the air than a shark”. I suppose this fact may be true if you reside in Kansas but not if you kayak the open coast of Central California from Davenport to Santa Cruz. Today we set off on such an adventure, part of a staff enrichment paddle with Blue Water Ventures. Armed with a marine radio, compass, extra fleece and a cell phone, 3…
  • The Mating Ritual of Elephant Seals

    bluewaterkim
    2 Feb 2015 | 2:16 pm
    http://www.bluewaterventures.org. From the birth of elephant Seal pups to the ritual of mating, our viewing  at Piedras Blancas south of Big Sur was  outstanding this past weekend. The video reveals some details of the mating strategies of  the Northern Elephant Seal, Mirounga angustirostris.  Be it by land or by water, a male elephant seal with make the trumpeting sound that is their signature, an erie noise  that resonates out through their strange proboscis (nose appendage).       Male elephant seals may simply raise their mighty proboscis upward bellowing out a cry…
  • Elephant Seal Battle

    bluewaterkim
    2 Feb 2015 | 8:08 am
    http://www.bluewaterventures.org. Launching our  yearly Elephant Seal program south of Big Sur today. Already we’ve had incredible views! During the breeding and pupping season, male elephant seals go to battle. Since most of their time now is spent on land to mate, this in water battle offered some incredible viewing. The thick skin around the neck referred to as the “chest shield” offers some protection to the head colliding and bites from other males. Join our naturalist-led adventures at httpa//www.bluewaterventures.org/:::www.bluewaterventures.org
  • Birth of a Seal

    bluewaterkim
    2 Feb 2015 | 7:13 am
    http://www.bluewaterventures.org. Many memorable moments on our Big Sur Seals and Morro Bay by Kayak program this past weekend. However, I will never forget walking up to the excitement of a newly born elephant seal. Imagine coming out of the shoot surrounded by trumpeting seals, massive males near by, females bickering and sea gulls eager to carry off your placenta! Wrinkled and wet, this newborn seal will soon start nursing as mom’s weight is transferred over. By the time a seal is weaned a mere 30 days later, the plump seal has quadrupled its weight enjoying the richest milk on…
  • A Very Naughty Sea Otter~Elkhorn Slough

    bluewaterkim
    28 Jan 2015 | 7:56 pm
    A very naughty otter literally popped up by our sea kayaks today tossing around a mangled grebe. My crew were instructed to splash, then paddle away as the otter approached us clutching a dead grebe in one paw and 2 shiny pebbles in the other. Moments later we heard the distinctive sound of pebble against kayak haul as the otter dove beneath us and tapped away. Its been a few years since I’ve watched an otter toss a grebe around like a rubber ducky. While its fascinating to watch, its a reminder that sea otters have large canines capable of ripping the head off a sea bird. We still have…
 
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    Lifescapes

  • Audiobook Giveaway!

    Susan Albert
    30 Mar 2015 | 5:34 am
    Win a free CD set of Mary Robinette Kowal's outstanding performance of A Wilder Rose, the true story behind the...
  • In bloom this week: Guild Iris

    Susan Albert
    27 Mar 2015 | 7:51 am
    Passalong plant. Decades ago, Bill's friend Jimmy Craig rescued a spadeful of these early white iris from the Campus Guild...
  • Goodreads Giveaway: A WILDER ROSE

    Susan Albert
    23 Mar 2015 | 5:42 am
    Autographed copies of A Wilder Rose, the new Lake Union edition. Go to Goodreads to enter, but better do it...
  • The Loveliest Thing in the Woods Today

    Susan Albert
    20 Mar 2015 | 6:00 am
    The loveliest thing in the woods today: a redbud tree, in view from my study window, with daffodils spilling through...
  • Launch Day: A WILDER ROSE

    Susan Albert
    17 Mar 2015 | 8:04 am
    Today is the launch day for the new edition of A Wilder Rose, now available in ebook, print, and (yes!)...
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    Coyote Crossing

  • Click by Chris Clarke

    Chris Clarke
    30 Mar 2015 | 10:08 pm
    Senna armata I drove a few days back, with a friend I had not seen for years, through the Pinto Basin and into the Chuckwalla Valley. She drove, which afforded me an unusual opportunity. Living alone except for Heart I am usually the one behind the wheel. On Saturday I had the chance to gawk at the desert through which we drove. There were wonders. The Pinto Basin ocotillos are in fine bloom, and psychotropically magenta flowers blaze from every clump of hedgehog cactus, and the roadsides were lined everywhere other than the pits of washes with desert senna blooming yellow like wallflowers…
  • Commands I have so far failed to train my dog to obey by Chris Clarke

    Chris Clarke
    20 Mar 2015 | 10:47 pm
    double espresso for here stop! in the name of love get down with your bad self smoke ‘em if you got ‘em what’s the word?* what do we want? when do we want it? stay; just a little bit longer check the oil meet the new boss don’t turn your back on me, baby * acceptable response: “Johannesburg”
  • This weekend by Chris Clarke

    Chris Clarke
    16 Mar 2015 | 11:34 pm
    In Lost Hills, California, the dog sleeps on a motel bed. A hundred yards east the long haul truckers drift gently off to sleep at 75 per. Their trailers sway sinuously, sensuously, heedless of the dotted white line.  I got off the road.  At Rodeo Beach today the brown pelicans skimmed brisk surf flawlessly, the wave crests missing their breast feathers by millimeters. We watched them fly in their characteristic perfect formation, bonded to each other inviolable and unseen.  In Maxwell Park, the scent of jasmine and the scent of citrus. The dog pulls me up steep night streets,…
  • Desert words I want by Chris Clarke

    Chris Clarke
    28 Feb 2015 | 11:11 pm
    This week The Guardian published perhaps the finest piece of writing I’ve ever seen in its pages, and it has gotten me thinking. The article, by British nature writer Robert Macfarlane, comes as a sort of prologue to his book Landmarks, due out next week. The book and the article in The Guardian discuss our increasing loss of a vocabulary befitting the landscapes in which we live. There’s a paragraph in Macfarlane’s Guardian piece that’s gotten a lot of attention, fittingly enough as it’s the springboard from which the rest of his essay sproings. That passage…
  • Ethical malfeasance and the Desert Renewable Energy Conservation Plan by Chris Clarke

    Chris Clarke
    23 Feb 2015 | 2:04 pm
    Today’s the deadline for commenting on the draft Desert Renewable Energy Conservation Plan (DRECP). Many of the people I know have been putting in long hours for the last several months pulling their comments together on the plan, which is gargantuan. The plan covers 22 million acres of the California desert, with a huge amount of land proposed as renewable energy Development Focus Areas (DFAs) and an even huger amount proposed for a modicum of protection, but what that protection actually entails is a matter of both vagueness and controversy. I suspect that most of the comments…
 
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    NextNature.net - Nature changes along with us

  • 3D Printed Eyes with WiFi Connection

    Alessia Andreotti
    1 Apr 2015 | 6:46 am
    Nowadays 3D printing is increasingly used for medical purposes and body upgrades to design devices, implants, and a variety of customized prosthetics, from a 3D printed face, to a skull, and even organs. In the future we may look at the world with new – artificial, 3D printed – eyes. Italian research studio MHOX is working on EYE, a 3D bioprinted sight augmentation. The project envisions the removal of the natural visual system and its replacement with a digitally designed 3D printed one. The original retina would be replaced by a new artificial network, able to offer enhanced…
  • Ambient City

    Van Mensvoort
    31 Mar 2015 | 6:57 am
    Today, 54% of the world’s population lives in urban areas, a percentage that is expected to increase to 66% by 2050. Will the city eventually be the nextnatural habitat for humans, like the beehive is for bees? The forthcoming Ars Electronica investigates the ambient city theme, questioning how cities will function when there are more robots than people working in factories, everything is intelligently interlinked, autos drive autonomously and drones deliver the mail.
  • Turning Cockroaches into Rescue Robots

    Yunus Emre Duyar
    30 Mar 2015 | 7:00 am
    Certain natural disasters such as earthquakes and Tsunamis often trap high numbers of people under unstable rubble, making search-and-rescue operations very difficult. Cyborg cockroaches might be of critical help for these disasters. North Caroline State University carried out a study in 2012, where researchers attached electrodes to the antennae of Madagascar hissing cockroaches to steer them. Currently, the team is working on tiny backpacks attached to the back of cockroaches, to transform these critters into moving networks of sensors. Cyborg cockroaches will soon be tested at mock…
  • Interview: Liam Young on Speculative Architecture and Engineering the Future

    NextNature.net
    29 Mar 2015 | 1:30 am
    Liam Young is a speculative architect who, in his own words, “operates in the spaces between design, fiction and futures”. With his London-based design think tank, Tomorrow’s Thoughts Today, he explores the future implications of emerging urban developments. Named by Blueprint magazine as one of 25 people who will change architecture and design, Young uses fiction and film to discuss probable futures. He has also co-founded Unknown Fields Division with Kate Davies, an award winning nomadic workshop that travels on annual expeditions to the ends of the Earth, investigating…
  • Should We Fear Thinking Machines?

    Maria Ramos
    28 Mar 2015 | 6:00 am
    From drones in the sky taking pictures and dropping bombs, to smart houses equipped with security systems and automation, it seems thinking machines could put the human race in danger. In the latest trend of Hollywood’s fascination with artificial intelligence, three new movies pose the conundrum of what happens when we make machines as smart as ourselves, and then try to interact with them. In Avengers: Age of Ultron, a league of superheroes have to put down a robot menace, in Ex Machina a software engineer must be our first contact with a female A.I., and in Chappie a robot…
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    Birding Dude

  • Yellow-throated Warbler at Valley Stream State Park

    31 Mar 2015 | 4:32 pm
    Score one for Nassau County and for Valley Stream State Park as one of the sought after warbler of the migration season was found there. Photos of a Yellow-throated Warbler were apparently posted to Facebook on 3-30 and our very own Big Year Dude, Anthony Collerton, a keen birder with a good sense of responsibility, ensured that the wider audience heard of it by posting the sighting to the NY listserv. I will have more to say on this !@#$@#% FB phenomenon in another post.Today, Robert Proniewych (try pronouncing that) refound the bird and called me to put out a post. Alas, I shirked my…
  • Wordless Wednesday

    25 Mar 2015 | 7:50 am
  • Mew Gull In Brooklyn Not A Fan Of Everyone It Seems

    24 Mar 2015 | 5:54 pm
    A few of my friends who I won't name, very likely cringed when they read or got word that Angus Wilson and I got exceptionally good looks at the continuing rare and elusive Mew Gull in Brooklyn on Sunday March 22nd. One friend who was supposed to be in Brooklyn looking for this Gull must have been especially stung. Ironically, I only ventured to Brooklyn to help him find this bird and he never even showed up. I hope he enjoys the photos--in the words of Captain Haddock "Blistering blundering bird-brain!" I empathize though, as many birders are not keen to putting in hours of wait and watch…
  • MY Wintering Baltimore Orioles

    21 Mar 2015 | 7:32 pm
    You won't find this in The Kingbird (a New York State Avian Records Committee Publication). It is certainly not an extraordinary feat by any means when it comes to records in the city and overwintering birds. However, it is a significant record for my backyard and on a personal level a most satisfying achievement that I was able to keep two Baltimore Orioles happy through this winter of 2015. These birds should have been overwintering somewhere in Central or South America but they chose my backyard for what turned out to be a tough winter. The first Baltimore Oriole showed up on December 31st…
  • Banded Ring-Billed Gull

    20 Mar 2015 | 9:05 pm
    On March 10th, Baisley Pond in Queens NY, produced the 5th banded Ring-billed Gull I have found there this winter. As I have done in the past, this bird was reported to the banding station in Quebec Canada where there is an ongoing research program on the ecology of Ring-billed Gulls. Within a matter of hours, I received word from Professor Jean - Francois Giroux who sent me information about  the bird, which was both banded in Quebec, Canada. My report, is the first entry in the re-sighting summary.I was really lucky to spot this banded RBGU in the flock of Gulls at Baisley Pond. It was…
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    Farmgirl Fare

  • Sunday Farm Photos: Oops.

    Farmgirl Susan
    29 Mar 2015 | 2:52 pm
    Looking out the bedroom window yesterday morning. More photos below. . .Click here for the rest of this post »
  • Wednesday Farm Photos: It's Spring!

    Farmgirl Susan
    25 Mar 2015 | 12:48 pm
    Jasper is so much help in the kitchen garden. Not.Spring: The time of year on a farm when it feels like you're already behind before it even begins.Whew! The weeks of snow and ice finally ended and we went straight up into the 70's. My hunky farmguy Joe and I would actually prefer at least another month of winter—minus the treacherous layer of ice covering everything—but Mother Nature is having none of it.The birds are chirping, the peepers are peeping, the grass is growing, the daffodils are blooming, and last week we saw at least a couple of thousand geese heading north. The…
  • Wednesday Dose of Cute: Baa, Baa, Baa!

    Farmgirl Susan
    24 Dec 2014 | 2:27 pm
    Merry Christmas!Wishing you a joyful, peaceful, and beautiful holiday season.— Susan, Joe, and 53 cute farm critters (including 7 donkeys; Dan just got pushed out of the picture)
  • Recipe: Quick and Easy (and Healthy!) Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Lemon and Parmesan

    Farmgirl Susan
    25 Nov 2014 | 12:44 pm
    Need a last-minute vegetable dish for your holiday table? These popular Quick & Easy Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Lemon and Parmesan are a scrumptious solution (recipe here).Do you have any plans for Thanksgiving? Joe's brother is arriving from out of town tonight in time for a dinner of freshly ground venison burgers on homemade Farmhouse White buns, and on Thursday we're all going to our friends' house down the road for a big feast, an all-day homemade candy buffet (peanut brittle! fudge! divinity!), lots of laughs, and possibly a team Scrabble tournament. Last year we got there…
  • Green Tomato Salsa Relish Recipe: No Sugar, Super Simple, Totally Delicious!

    Farmgirl Susan
    27 Oct 2014 | 8:30 am
    Wondering what to do with green tomatoes? Try my no sugar, super simple, salsa-like green tomato relish. No blanching, peeling, or canning (unless you want to) required.We've already had a couple of light frosts this year, but from the hot and humid weather we've been having lately you'd never guess it was the end of October in Missouri. By the end of the week they're saying it'll dip back down to 30 degrees F, though, and I think I'm ready to focus on the kale and other cool weather greens and finally call an end to tomato season in my kitchen garden.It's become…
 
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    10,000 Birds

  • Duncan’s 2015 List

    Duncan
    1 Apr 2015 | 4:00 am
    Another year, another year list. I have to confess to an increasing ambivalence about year lists. On the whole I kind of enjoy the impetus to target a bird I’ve seen before once, don’t have much interest in, and probably wouldn’t look at otherwise. And there is always fun in seeing how many you can get in a year. But on a few occasions earlier this year I began to wonder if I was dismissing good birds cause I already had them this year, or barely registering birds beyond ticking them off. It may simply be that I got a little birded out earlier this year, something that may…
  • What is the State Bird of Maine?

    Erika Zambello
    31 Mar 2015 | 10:00 am
    As I am a native of Maine, it is only fitting that my first state bird post is on the Black-capped Chickadee (Poecile atricapillus). This little songbird has a range that extends across the United States and Canada, and is a ubiquitous backyard feeder visitor. As it is a common sight throughout New England, it is no surprise that this chickadee species is also the state bird of Massachusetts. Tom Brown, Jr., famous for his tracker books and field guides, once wrote that, “We learned to be patient observers like the owl. We learn cleverness from the crow, and courage from the…
  • Are Redpolls Just One Species?

    Corey
    30 Mar 2015 | 6:01 pm
    It sure looks like it! Gustave Axelson has a nice breakdown of a recent genetic analysis of redpolls on Cornell’s All About Birds Blog: Mason and Taylor looked beyond the plumage into strands of the birds’ DNA in the most extensive look ever at the redpoll genome. Whereas previous genetic analyses of redpolls looked at just 11 regions of the genome (at most), Mason and Taylor examined 235,000 regions. (That impressive number is a testament to the exponential advances in DNA-sequencing technology, but the researchers are quick to note it’s still less than 1% of the total genome.) In…
  • Late March Birding in Queens

    Corey
    30 Mar 2015 | 4:18 am
    Late March in my home borough of New York City is typically when Eastern Phoebe, Pine Warbler, American Woodcock, Osprey, and other early migrants are back but many of our wintering birds, like Snow Goose and American Tree Sparrow, are still sticking around. It is a transitional time and the weather shows it, with warmer days and the sun higher in the sky but the possibility of below-freezing nights and snow still present. We had a bit of both this past weekend, with snow flurries on Saturday, a dip below freezing Saturday night, and bright sunshine on Sunday though it didn’t get…
  • Best Bird of the Weekend (Last of March 2015)

    Mike
    29 Mar 2015 | 11:22 pm
    Nearly everywhere in the world, birds are on the wing, not just traveling to and from their daily haunts but returning to their ancestral circuit. Based on the the time of year, many people I know are also on the wing. So best of luck to any and all creatures striving towards a distant horizon right now. Old Man Winter still has my part of the world firmly under his hoary thumb. Instead of enjoying early migrants, I can appreciate the spring songs of my local winter birds. Every year, I’m puzzled by the song of the Dark-eyed Junco, but thrilled when I identify the artist. Normally…
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    simple.green.organic.happy.

  • How to Fight Indoor Air Pollution in Your Home

    Robin
    31 Mar 2015 | 7:43 pm
    Home is the nicest word there is. ―Laura Ingalls Wilder We make our houses tighter and tighter, which is great for our power bill but maybe not so hot for our health: basically, we’re trapping in a lot of chemicals and pollutants for us to breathe. Believe it or not, indoor air is more polluted than outdoor air, up to five times as polluted; in 2012 household air pollution made up 7.7% of global mortalities. What sort of pollutants are we talking about, and how we can clear out our indoor air? Check out this infographic on health issues related to indoor air pollution and what…
  • Don’t Kick Your Christmas Tree to the Curb! Repurpose or Recycle It.

    Robin
    2 Jan 2015 | 1:17 pm
    To dwellers in a wood, almost every species of tree has its voice as well as its feature. ―Thomas Hardy, Under the Greenwood Tree The ball has dropped, it’s after New Year’s and time to undeck the halls and untrim the trees. Every year I see tons of trees sitting curbside waiting to be picked up with the trash and taken to the landfill; it makes me sad that they had purpose for such a short time. While I do think real trees are better than fake (especially if you buy one from a local, family owned business!) we can do better, people. Get more out of your Christmas tree:…
  • Light It Up.

    Robin
    14 Sep 2014 | 8:26 pm
    Why do you go away? So that you can come back. So that you can see the place you came from with new eyes and extra colors. And the people there see you differently, too. Coming back to where you started is not the same as never leaving. ―Terry Pratchett, A Hat Full of Sky   So, I was having some issues behind the scenes here— basically, I was locked out of my blogs. I’d click the link to be sent a new password, but I’ve been blogging so long now that the password was going to a now-defunct email address. It was frustrating and sort of scary while also being sort of…
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    Steve Creek Outdoors

  • The Colorful Wood Duck

    Steve Creek
    29 Mar 2015 | 2:56 am
    The Wood Duck has been a difficult bird for me to get a good clear photograph of. I see them mainly in the wooded swamps that we have here in my area. They are a very difficult duck to stalk. This colorful Wood Duck was nice enough to pose for me out in the open which seems to never happen for me. This was at the Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma. Wood Duck – Canon 7D | Canon EF100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L | @400mm | 1/400 | f/5.6 | ISO 800 Wood Duck Facts Their breeding habitat is wooded swamps, shallow lakes, marshes or ponds, and creeks in eastern North America, the west coast of…
  • Fox Squirrels Are Important Tree Seed Dispersers

    Steve Creek
    27 Mar 2015 | 3:04 am
    Sometimes I can’t stand these Fox Squirrels because they are a nuisance and they raid my bird feeders but they do serve an important purpose. When squirrels bury seeds and forget them, these seeds are likely to sprout where they were placed. Because of this, squirrels promote the growth of certain kinds of trees. Fox Squirrel – Canon 7D2 | Canon EF100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L v2 | @400mm | 1/1250 | f/5.6 | ISO 800 Fox Squirrel Facts Fox squirrels are omnivores, eating everything from plant matter to insects, birds, and carrion. Their diet depends on what is available in the area in which…
  • The Northern Mockingbirds Are Singing

    Steve Creek
    26 Mar 2015 | 3:27 am
    The Northern Mockingbirds have started singing here in my area. They are mainly singing in the daytime but I’m sure that will change soon. I’m still photographing at the Fort Smith National Historic Site here in Arkansas. Northern Mockingbird – Canon 7D2 | Canon EF100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L v2 | @400mm | 1/640 | f/5.6 | ISO 2000 Northern Mockingbird – Canon 7D2 | Canon EF100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L v2 | @400mm | 1/640 | f/5.6 | ISO 1250 Northern Mockingbird Facts Northern Mockingbirds sing all through the day, and often into the night. Most nocturnal singers are unmated males,…
  • When The Dogwood Bloom, Crappies Begin To Bite

    Steve Creek
    24 Mar 2015 | 3:01 am
    I traveled to the Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma yesterday but it was so foggy I didn’t make any good photos. I sat and watched a Great Blue Heron catching Crayfish and it was very close but the fog was just to thick. The Dogwood trees in this area are blooming so I did see lots of people fishing. I was always told that when the Dogwood blooms that this was the best time to be out Crappie fishing. Crappie Fishing – Canon 7D2 | Canon EF100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L v2 | @400mm | 1/1250 | f/8.0 | ISO 500 Great Blue Heron – Canon 7D2 | Canon EF100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L v2 |…
  • A White-throated Sparrow On The Ground

    Steve Creek
    23 Mar 2015 | 2:54 am
    Several White-throated Sparrows were feeding around the train tracks at the Fort Smith National Historic Site here in Arkansas. I know I have mentioned this several times already but this is a great place to see several different types of birds. White-throated Sparrow – Canon 7D2 | Canon EF100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L v2 | @400mm | 1/1250 | f/5.6 | ISO 800 White-Throated Sparrow Facts These birds forage on the ground under or near thickets or in low vegetation. They mainly eat seeds, insects and berries, and are attracted to bird feeders. The post A White-throated Sparrow On The Ground appeared…
 
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    Conservation Jobs

  • UK’s First Refuge for Hedgehogs

    Alex Taylor
    25 Mar 2015 | 4:41 am
    Just six decades ago, hedgehogs numbered around 36 million. There are now less than one million. In an attempt to reverse this decline, the first large-scale hedgehog conservation area in the UK opened last week. The 90-hectare (220-acre) refuge was created by the Warwickshire Wildlife Trust in Solihull in the West Midlands, and is funded […]
  • Bring Back the Lynx

    Alex Taylor
    18 Mar 2015 | 4:38 am
    The Eurasian lynx is distributed across Western Europe, Russia and central Asia. It was once found in the UK but was wiped out by hunting and habitat destruction around 500AD. However, the recognition of the valuable role it played here, mainly as a predator of deer, has led to calls for the lynx to be […]
  • Wild Yaks Climbing High

    Alex Taylor
    11 Mar 2015 | 4:50 am
    Animals that live at higher elevations will be hard hit by climate change. The wild yak is one such species. Numbering around 10,000 individuals they are vulnerable to extinction, facing threats such as habitat loss, poaching and competition with domestic yaks and their human herders. A new study led by a team of researchers from […]
  • Marine Debris Affects Hundreds of Species

    Alex Taylor
    6 Mar 2015 | 4:20 am
    The most comprehensive study on the impact of marine debris in more than a decade has recently been published. Researchers at Plymouth University found that a total of 693 species have been documented as having encountered man-made debris such as plastic and glass. In the past five decades 44,000 animals and organisms throughout the world […]
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    Long Island Environmental News

  • Breaking News

    19 Feb 2030 | 5:35 am
    Please send us your news by posting to our Facebook page for review.
  • Fire Island's New Inlet Comes of Age

    27 Feb 2015 | 6:48 am
    November 15, 2014Smith Point BeachSunny and coldWe took a loop around Fire Island led by Eric Powers, starting at Smith Point Beach County Park and walking through Fire Island National Seashore to the breach called “New Inlet” created by Superstorm Sandy into Bellport Bay, almost directly across from the mouth of Carmans River.  Along the way, we covered whales (we even got to see some humpback whales off the shore!); different sea creatures, their shells, and behavior; and the structure and wildlife of the island that constitutes the main defense against hurricanes and other violent…
  • Hither Hills Hike – Abundant Sumac and an Icy Wetland Oasis

    20 Feb 2015 | 5:11 am
    Contributed by David Kennedy as a Quality Parks Master Naturalist StudentAmong the many plants that we observed during our February 7, 2015 hike in Hither Hills State Park, the most interesting and beautiful from my perspective was smooth sumac (Rhus glabra). We encountered this species sporadically but in ever increasing numbers as we hiked westward from the overlook area, culminating in large, nearly mono-specific stand of smooth sumac located to either side of the trail, in the area just east of the LIRR tracks. The hundreds of deep crimson-to-scarlet red, oblong fruit clusters of the…
  • Peconic Estuary Program Grant Recipients To Improve Long Island Water Quality

    14 Feb 2015 | 4:31 am
    The Peconic Estuary Program works together with the community to achieve its goals for protecting and restoring the Long Island Peconic Estuary ecosystem. This recent press release announced that the following awardees will receive $5,000 to fund their projects and further the goals of the Peconic Estuary Program's Comprehensive Conservation and Management Plan, linking restoration projects with public participation.The first grant, entitled, "Sustainable Aquaculture: A New Maritime History," was awarded to the The Conscience Point Shellfish Hatchery.  The Hatchery…
  • New Mountain Bicycling Trail Experience at Edgewood Preserve, Began in Fall 2014

    26 Jan 2015 | 4:36 am
    Thank You Denis Byrne for sharing this story by Chris Malanga. A new nonexclusive, mountain bicycling trail is being worked on by many  CLIMB volunteers. Began last fall, at the Edgewood Preserve, according to Chris Malanga and Denis Byrne, this trails is also great for running too. Most of the trail is relatively easy, except for sections 6 and 8 which are considered "black diamonds" and require some bike handling skills. Deer Park is mostly flat so they used leftover ditches and other drainage infrastructure to make it a workout too. Edgewood Preserve - From Section 6 to Section 7…
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    Birding Pictures

  • A Dog and his Deer: Best Buds

    Lauren Shaffer
    26 Mar 2015 | 2:30 pm
    We’ve all seen commercials and videos recently of interesting animal buddies, but today was the first time I witnessed a doggie/deer combo myself. Although I frequent this back road often, looking for birds, I’ve never seen a dog running around loose. And this one was accompanied by a young deer. They sauntered down the middle of the road, checking out a mailbox, the dog sniffing the post and the deer licking the rusty latch. Next they stop for a little affection, sniffing and giving little animal kisses. Awww!! After sealing their friendship with a kiss, they turn and continue…
  • Pine Siskins

    Lauren Shaffer
    15 Mar 2015 | 5:44 am
    Siskins are Sassy! Their needle-sharp beaks and quick movements are good for two things: for eating you out of house and home, and for fighting off each other and their rivals at the thistle feeder. Not seen every year, these finches have an irruption year when food is scarce in the north where they usually winter. When they do show up, they come in big numbers and can easily go through 25-pound bags of “black gold” or thistle seed, although they will eat sunflower seeds also. Besides their high-pitched twittering, Pine Siskins also make a rising SZZzzrreee! sound. Pine Siskins…
  • How do birds find enough to eat in the winter? The Horned Lark Story

    Lauren Shaffer
    11 Mar 2015 | 10:34 am
    How do birds find enough to eat in the winter? They are very resourceful, even though there may be a thick blanket of snow on the ground.  Discovering how Horned Larks find food in the winter is both entertaining and amazing. They are ground nesters and foragers, thus a good example of adapting to the environment in difficult winters. All about Birds says this about Horned Larks: Look carefully at a bare, brown field, especially in winter, and you may be surprised to see it crawling with little brown shapes. When they turn, you may see a neat yellow face, black mask, and tiny black…
  • Rough-legged Hawk

    Lauren Shaffer
    3 Mar 2015 | 12:15 pm
    The Rough-legged Hawk, a gorgeous raptor which breeds in the Artic, comes south in the winter through Canada to stay in much of the U.S. in order to find food. We see them here in rural Central PA towards the middle of winter, in good numbers. They are also found in Asia, Europe and Greenland unlike our other buteos. Their feet are covered with feathers, hence the name “Rough-legged.” Rough-leggeds have two color morphs, light and dark, and are strikingly patterned. There are also differences according to age and sex. The bird pictured above and below is an adult male light…
  • Winter Birding

    Lauren Shaffer
    3 Feb 2015 | 5:47 pm
    The sun finally came out this morning in rural Central Pa, so I braved the crazy 4 degrees with ear muffs, hand warmers, gloves, heavy coat and boots, and went birding! For four hours!! With the bright snow and the intense sunlight, I was less than happy with the umpteen pictures I took, but it was still fun. I put the seat warmer on, put the window down so I could hear the Horned Larks flying over the fields, and drove the back roads. This is winter road birding at its finest. When there’s something good, the blinkers go on, and the car is parked as far off the road as possible. We…
 
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    Blooms Today

  • Flower and Garden Activities for Kids

    Blooms Today
    30 Mar 2015 | 5:56 am
    The garden can be a great place to get your kids outdoors and help them learn about plants and how to work with their hands. One of the most fun features of a garden for kids is the flowering plants. These pretty spectacles offer a wide variety of gardening and crafting options so your kids can happily turn off the TV and get their hands a little flowery.       Gardening When many think of gardening, their minds generally gravitate toward adults with their pruners and gardening pants but this doesn’t have to be the case. There are many kid-friendly tasks to perform in the…
  • Gardening Terms Every Gardener Should Know

    Blooms Today
    23 Mar 2015 | 7:56 am
    There are a few pro-terms all gardeners know. They can identify their plants’ blooming style and its part. They can tell you exactly what to call the clippings of the little brown leaves. They can even tell you the best tools to use to get your desired results. But with all of this information to learn, what is a beginning gardener to do? Start with some essential terms that will have you fitting right in at your gardening club.     Lifecycle Types of Plants Begonias When talking to a gardener, you’re sure to hear them mention their replanting plans. These are often influenced…
  • Totally Steal-able Centerpiece Ideas

    Blooms Today
    19 Mar 2015 | 3:00 am
    There is always that one friend who pulls out the perfect centerpiece for any occasion. It’s original, it’s unique, and it’s relevant. So what are some ways to make your own enviable centerpiece? A few helpful hints can get the ball rolling toward centerpiece glory.           Centerpiece Styles When contemplating the centerpiece you’d like to build, first decide which style will best suit your space and purposes. Is something exciting and colorful what you’re looking for, or will simple elegance be the better choice? For more exciting centerpieces, color…
  • Making Flowers Out of Veggies

    Blooms Today
    16 Mar 2015 | 1:00 am
    Carving vegetables can be a fun and nutritious way to pass the afternoon. But how do you get started? Here are some great tips and ideas to get you on your way to making your very own beautiful and edible bouquet!           Beginner’s Tips Get your tools in order. When carving vegetables, it’s important that you have a vegetable peeler, toothpicks, and a paring knife at the ready. A well-prepared carver is a successful one and having the tools you need will get you off to a great start. Once you have your tools in order, it’s time to learn from the best. There…
  • The Process of Drying Flowers

    Blooms Today
    11 Mar 2015 | 5:00 am
    Flowers are beautiful gifts. They are welcome accompaniments at all events, occasions, times of year, and just to say hello. Live specimens will only remain vivid and healthy for a period of time, and then the gift is gone. You may have the vase, but nothing remains of the flowers that were so lovely to look at in your window, kitchen table, or on your desk at work. You can, however, transform your flowers into a new decoration by drying them.     It is best to start the drying process when your flowers are still in their prime. If you start the process too late, then the petals may…
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    Friendly Eco Might

  • Vegan Diet Helps Reduce Heart Disease Risk In Children | Vegan Diet The Best For Children

    5 Mar 2015 | 1:29 am
    A contemporary study examines the results of a vegan diet and the American Heart Association diet on rotund children with immense cholesterol. The plant-based and low-fat wins the day. Obesity levels are terribly high among American youth. Since thirty years, the pace of obesity has increased by two times in kids between 6-11 years old and increased by three times in those between 12-19 years old. With it comes health issues and bigger risk of heart stroke, cardiovascular disease, and type two diabetes.Michael Macklin, a pediatrician, conducted a 4 week study to match the results of the…
  • Salamanders - The Incredible Ally | Salamanders Help To Fight Against Global Warming

    16 Feb 2015 | 2:33 am
    In our fight against global warming, we've an incredible ally. Who? The little salamanders that ramble the forests of most of the world! In North-America, they're truly the foremost galore vertebrate, and that they eat lots of insects. This can be useful because this prevents these insects from intake the maximum amount of the leaf litter on the forest floor. If this leaf litter is left alone long enough, a part of it'll be converted into humus (click here to know how to prepare compost at home), a method that sequesters carbon within the soil. Because salamanders eat numerous insects, they…
  • Dogs Make It Special For You | Dogs Know Whether You Are Happy or Upset

    15 Feb 2015 | 1:25 am
    Do you have a pet dog in your home? If yes, you are lucky to have a cheerful companion. Nevertheless, it is so wistful to hear that, on an average, dogs live for 15-25 years. Dogs do have feelings. It hurts his heart when you are away for a long time. Slowly he becomes a member of your family. You don't wig out when he jumps on you or lick your face. At times, he makes you feel elated when you are disturbed and you talk to him even though you are certain that he doesn't understand the language. He also protects you when you are in danger. No matter how busy you are, you still spend a bit of…
  • Apple Cider Vinegar: 18 Uses of Apple Cider Vinegar | How Apple Cider Vinegar is Helpful

    23 Jan 2015 | 4:18 am
    Apple cider vinegar is an impressively versatile ingredient. It seems there are only few household problems that the apple cider vinegar can't solve. It has countless uses beyond the occasional salad dressing. Try the following list and even you'll find yourself getting incorporated with apple cider vinegar! 1. Apple cider vinegar is a natural and cheap toner for your skin, as it neutralizes the pH and makes your skin smooth and soft. If the smell is very strong, then mix with water in the ratio 1:1 and wipe over your face. 2. Use of Apple Cider Vinegar to condition your hair is really…
  • Anti-theft Technology Inspired by Bombardier Beetle | Bombardier Beetle Defense Mechanism in Anti-theft Technology

    21 Jan 2015 | 3:01 am
    It is awesome to hear that the insects have got self defense mechanism. There may be many insects with that feature. But the bombardier beetle has a very advanced defense mechanism. It is an ordinary beetle that exists in all continents except the Antarctica. The bombardier beetle liberates a chemical spray that makes predators run away when it is provoked.How does the Bombardier Beetle do that? This 1 centimeter long bombardier beetle stores hydrogen peroxide and hydroquinone in two separate compartments of its abdomen. These two chemicals are released in a reaction chamber and mix with…
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