Nature

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  • Know your network

    Nature - Issue - nature.com science feeds
    Peter Fiske
    25 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Know your network Nature 524, 7566 (2015). doi:10.1038/nj7566-507a Author: Peter Fiske Seek and cultivate professional relationships to advance your career, says Peter Fiske.
  • How cities can beat the heat

    NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
    Hannah Hoag
    25 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Rising temperatures are threatening urban areas, but efforts to cool them may not work as planned.Nature 524 402 doi: 10.1038/524402a
  • About

    Nature
    Eric R. Olson
    26 Aug 2015 | 2:08 pm
    Despite living in the wild in Botswana for 30 years, filming, researching and exploring the world they have come to know so well, award-winning filmmakers and conservationists Dereck and Beverly Joubert say they are often still surprised by what they come across on their journeys. Such was the case when the couple were exploring the backwaters of the bush one day and stumbled upon the skulls of two large bull elephants with their ivory tusks intact. To the Jouberts, this is always cause for celebration because it means the giants died of natural causes and not, for example, from poaching,…
  • Extreme Tidepooling Central California Coast

    [BWV] Blue Water News
    bluewaterkim
    14 Aug 2015 | 10:53 am
    OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA Its been a week of EXTREME fun and exploration with my Clemson graduate school friends, a 33 year reunion! At daybreak, we headed to Davenport Landing for extreme tidepooling. From kayaking among the giants (humpback whales) to intertidal discoveries its been an amazing week! We found only one healthy ochre sea star (Pisaster orchraceus) spared from the fatal sea star wasting syndrome. Thought to be a virus effecting sea stars from Alaska to Baja, SSWS has researchers along our coast working hard for more answers. OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA For more…
  • Philistines introduced sycamore, cumin and opium poppy into Israel during the Iron Age

    Nature News -- ScienceDaily
    28 Aug 2015 | 8:27 am
    A new study describes the bio-archaeological remains of the Philistine culture in Israel during the Iron Age (12th century to 7th century BCE). The results of this research indicate that the ca. 600 year presence of the Philistine culture had a major and long-term impact on local floral biodiversity.
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    Nature - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Know your network

    Peter Fiske
    25 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Know your network Nature 524, 7566 (2015). doi:10.1038/nj7566-507a Author: Peter Fiske Seek and cultivate professional relationships to advance your career, says Peter Fiske.
  • Human evolution: Old finger with modern traits

    25 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Human evolution: Old finger with modern traits Nature 524, 7566 (2015). doi:10.1038/524391a A 1.84-million-year-old finger bone from Tanzania is the oldest known hominin hand bone with human-like features.Ancient human relatives used stone tools 2 million to 3 million years ago, but had hands that were suited to living in trees. A team led by Manuel Domínguez-Rodrigo
  • Astrophysics: Cosmic neutrinos abound

    25 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Astrophysics: Cosmic neutrinos abound Nature 524, 7566 (2015). doi:10.1038/524391e Super-high-energy neutrinos from outside the Milky Way pepper Earth from all directions.Neutrinos are created in the Universe's most violent environments and travel through it almost unimpeded, providing a way to study distant astronomical objects. A team at the IceCube Neutrino Observatory at the South
  • We must build resilience into our communities

    Erwann Michel-Kerjan
    25 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    We must build resilience into our communities Nature 524, 7566 (2015). http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/524389a Author: Erwann Michel-Kerjan Innovative approaches can better equip society to deal with natural disasters and other shocks, says Erwann Michel-Kerjan.
  • Medical microbiology: Lung pathogen evolves in isolation

    25 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Medical microbiology: Lung pathogen evolves in isolation Nature 524, 7566 (2015). doi:10.1038/524391c Bacteria that infect the lungs of people with cystic fibrosis evolve into different forms in various parts of the lungs.Pradeep Singh at the University of Washington in Seattle and his team dissected the infected lungs of ten people with the disease who were having
 
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    Nature

  • About

    Eric R. Olson
    26 Aug 2015 | 2:08 pm
    Despite living in the wild in Botswana for 30 years, filming, researching and exploring the world they have come to know so well, award-winning filmmakers and conservationists Dereck and Beverly Joubert say they are often still surprised by what they come across on their journeys. Such was the case when the couple were exploring the backwaters of the bush one day and stumbled upon the skulls of two large bull elephants with their ivory tusks intact. To the Jouberts, this is always cause for celebration because it means the giants died of natural causes and not, for example, from poaching,…
  • Male Elephant Seals Battle Over Females

    Eric R. Olson
    24 Aug 2015 | 1:22 pm
    In a winner-take-all contest, a male elephant seals challenges a rival for access to his harem of females. The post Male Elephant Seals Battle Over Females appeared first on Nature.
  • The Funkiest Monkeys in Photos

    Eric R. Olson
    18 Jun 2015 | 8:35 am
    Swipe left or right to view gallery Full Screen Wildlife cameraman & biologist Colin Stafford-Johnson being groomed. ©Giyarto“Peanut,” Stafford-Johnson’s “favorite” Crested Black Macaque.©GiyartoColin Stafford-Johnson filming Crested Black Macaques. ©GiyartoJuvenile being groomed. ©GiyartoMale Crested Black Macaque.©GiyartoMale Crested Black Macaque. ©GiyartoTarzan in a tree.©Dave MothershowTarzan ©Dave MothershowTroop grooming on a log. ©Dave Mothershow The post The Funkiest Monkeys in Photos appeared first on Nature.
  • Additional Resources

    Eric R. Olson
    28 May 2015 | 2:11 pm
    Articles Republican Wyoming on Board With Federal Sage Grouse Policy (New York Times – May 29, 2015) http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/2015/05/29/us/ap-us-sage-grouse-interior.html?_r=0 U.S. to Limit Petroleum Drilling on Habitat of Greater Sage Grouse (New York Times – May 28, 2015) http://www.nytimes.com/2015/05/29/business/us-to-limit-petroleum-drilling-on-habitat-of-greater-sage-grouse.html Puffy, Feathered Sticking Point of a $612 Billion House Bill (New York Times – May 20, 2015)…
  • Additional Resources

    Eric R. Olson
    28 May 2015 | 1:32 pm
    Videos Mystery Monkeys of Shangri-La Panel Discussion at the Asia Society http://asiasociety.org/video/mystery-monkeys-shangri-la-panel-discussion-complete Articles Saving the Yunnan Snub-nosed Monkey http://www.drmartinwilliams.com/conservation/xi-zhinong.html Grueter et al. Dietary Profile of Rhinopithecus bieti and Its Socioecological Implications. International Journal of Primatology, 2009. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2758362/ Grueter et al. Fallback foods of temperate-living primates: a case study on snub-nosed monkeys. International Journal of Primatology, 2009.
 
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    [BWV] Blue Water News

  • Extreme Tidepooling Central California Coast

    bluewaterkim
    14 Aug 2015 | 10:53 am
    OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA Its been a week of EXTREME fun and exploration with my Clemson graduate school friends, a 33 year reunion! At daybreak, we headed to Davenport Landing for extreme tidepooling. From kayaking among the giants (humpback whales) to intertidal discoveries its been an amazing week! We found only one healthy ochre sea star (Pisaster orchraceus) spared from the fatal sea star wasting syndrome. Thought to be a virus effecting sea stars from Alaska to Baja, SSWS has researchers along our coast working hard for more answers. OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA For more…
  • Humpback Whales of Monterey Bay

    bluewaterkim
    12 Aug 2015 | 4:11 pm
    Outstanding close encounter with a mother and calf Humpback whale today! It is  a truly remarkable  honor to live on the edge of Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary. Coined the “Serengeti of the Sea”, Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary lies within a biologically rich pathway intersecting the migration patterns of an array of marine mammals, sea birds and even our planet’s largest sea turtle, the leatherback. 34 species of marine mammals are found within out extraordinary sanctuary, the largest federally protected marine reserve in the United States. Several days ago on…
  • Kayaking Among Humpback Whales of Monterey Bay

    bluewaterkim
    11 Aug 2015 | 6:36 am
    OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA What a spectacular day on the water with the humpback whales and marine wonders of the Monterey Bay. Bait fish have moved in close to our coast again creating a feeding frenzy among sea birds, sea lions, dolphins and whales. Humpbacks, which are capable of switching their diet from krill to bait fish thrive in such conditions where as other baleen whales such as Blues are restricted to krill blooms. Check out http://www.bluewaterventures.org for our next whales and wildlife adventure by kayak, bioluminescence night paddles, Florida manatees, Baja whales and more! 
  • Man in The Gray Suit

    bluewaterkim
    8 Mar 2015 | 6:54 pm
    http://www.bluewaterventures.org. A budding shark enthusiast, a mere 10 years of age and part of my Marine Science Camp excitedly shared a memorable factoid with me a few years ago. “Ya know Kim, you are more likely to die from a toilet seat whirling through the air than a shark”. I suppose this fact may be true if you reside in Kansas but not if you kayak the open coast of Central California from Davenport to Santa Cruz. Today we set off on such an adventure, part of a staff enrichment paddle with Blue Water Ventures. Armed with a marine radio, compass, extra fleece and a cell phone, 3…
  • The Mating Ritual of Elephant Seals

    bluewaterkim
    2 Feb 2015 | 2:16 pm
    http://www.bluewaterventures.org. From the birth of elephant Seal pups to the ritual of mating, our viewing  at Piedras Blancas south of Big Sur was  outstanding this past weekend. The video reveals some details of the mating strategies of  the Northern Elephant Seal, Mirounga angustirostris.  Be it by land or by water, a male elephant seal with make the trumpeting sound that is their signature, an erie noise  that resonates out through their strange proboscis (nose appendage).       Male elephant seals may simply raise their mighty proboscis upward bellowing out a cry…
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    Nature News -- ScienceDaily

  • Philistines introduced sycamore, cumin and opium poppy into Israel during the Iron Age

    28 Aug 2015 | 8:27 am
    A new study describes the bio-archaeological remains of the Philistine culture in Israel during the Iron Age (12th century to 7th century BCE). The results of this research indicate that the ca. 600 year presence of the Philistine culture had a major and long-term impact on local floral biodiversity.
  • Future climate models greatly affected by fungi and bacteria

    28 Aug 2015 | 5:14 am
    Researchers have shown that our understanding of how organic material is decomposed by fungi and bacteria is fundamentally wrong. This means that climate models that include microorganisms to estimate future climate change must be reconsidered.
  • Fishermen discards could increase prevalence of turtle disease in Turks and Caicos

    27 Aug 2015 | 6:56 pm
    The team surveyed cases of green turtle fibropapillomatosis disease, which creates unsightly pink tumors on the turtles' flesh. Although benign, they can impede turtles' vision and movement, as well as feeding, swimming and organ function. The virus is not thought to be dangerous to humans. Over two years, around 13 percent of green turtles found in waters had the disease. In contrast, fishermen did not land any diseased turtles during this period, even though they were fishing in areas where diseased animals were prevalent.
  • If you build it they will come: Frogs flourish in humanmade ponds

    27 Aug 2015 | 12:46 pm
    A new study shows that frogs have begun to use humanmade ponds to their benefit.
  • Way for eagles and wind turbines to coexist

    27 Aug 2015 | 12:44 pm
    Collisions with wind turbines kill about 100 golden eagles a year in some locations, but a new study that maps both potential wind-power sites and nesting patterns of the birds reveals sweet spots, where potential for wind power is greatest with a lower threat to nesting eagles.
 
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    Lifescapes

  • Works in progress

    Susan Albert
    16 Aug 2015 | 7:40 am
    Some people like to finish things--but that's not me. When I complete one thing, I'm happiest when I can turn...
  • Button Bushes, Barred Rocks, & Books

    Susan Albert
    25 Jul 2015 | 6:45 am
    The button bushes (Cephalanthus occidentalis) that grow along our little creek are in full bloom just now, their round, highly...
  • Writing Spider at Work

    Susan Albert
    11 Jul 2015 | 6:22 am
    Every year, here at Meadow Knoll, just outside the kitchen door, a writing spider (a golden silk orb spider) sets...
  • Let there be . . . squash!

    Susan Albert
    28 Jun 2015 | 7:44 am
    The pumpkins and summer squash are blooming in the garden, and the squash bees (Peponapis sp.) are hard at work....
  • In Bloom This Week: Chaste Tree

    Susan Albert
    19 Jun 2015 | 6:46 am
    I miss the lilacs I grew up with in Illinois--miss their distinctive fragrance and their lovely purple flowers. Our climate...
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    Coyote Crossing

  • And this is his sofa, is it? by Chris Clarke

    Chris Clarke
    18 Aug 2015 | 6:24 pm
    Water flat as glass. I dip the left blade of my paddle into it. It makes no sound. The right blade makes no sound. Then the left. The sun has not yet risen. Caspian terns regard us sidelong, dive with abandon. Cormorants stand on the low tide banks. They air their wings in solemn, funereal circles. Judgments of cormorants. We skitter along the surface, water striders in sit-on-top kayaks. Anchovies leap like tossed pebbles, and she grins, and then so do I. We pivot and veer, compass needles in search of true north. We drift on the sea’s slow breathtaking. Pink sky, then gray, then blue…
  • Let ‘Er Drift by Chris Clarke

    Chris Clarke
    26 Jun 2015 | 5:55 pm
    How long has it been since my life truly began, since I saw this stretch of road for the first time? I crane my neck for a better view down the canyon. 70 per and the slabs of concrete sing. The Yuba shines in the mid-afternoon, and I almost wake her by mentioning it. “Let ‘Er Drift,” the Caltrans sign reminds the truckers on the downgrade. Foot off the pedal. Take ‘er easy. Let the planet do the work, that inexorable pull downward and toward the west. How long has it been since I first felt that pull? Since that first breath of sun-warmed pine, that first dazzle of…
  • Louis Sahagun makes it into the Joshua Tree book by Chris Clarke

    Chris Clarke
    6 Jun 2015 | 5:20 pm
    … for vectoring two pieces of folklore: “The species scientists know as Yucca brevifolia isn’t actually a tree; it’s a succulent. ” and “They were named for the biblical figure Joshua by members of a band of Mormons traveling through the Cajon Pass back to Utah in 1857. They imagined the trees as shaggy prophets, their outstretched limbs pointing the way to their promised land.” Why are these wrong? Answers lie below the photo of the succulent trees which probably did not get their common name from migrating Mormons. On Cima Dome. Photo copyright…
  • “Moon’s up.” by Chris Clarke

    Chris Clarke
    3 Jun 2015 | 9:13 pm
    “I said, Moon’s up.” Her voice filtered into the house from out back. A familiar tone. Pretending at impatience. “Sorry! Coming.” He closed the screen, flicked off the row of switches, briefly checked the level on the bank of batteries. Good. Enough charge there to finish his chapter tomorrow even if the sun never came up. He pushed his chair in, slipped his huaraches on, wandered out back to find her. “Over here.” There was no way he’d have missed her, red rising moon shining off her shock of white hair, but he thanked her anyway.
  • Grassroots by Chris Clarke

    Chris Clarke
    19 May 2015 | 3:23 pm
    I have made my share of mistakes in this life, errors manifold and sundry, and lately I think the worst one has been to expect unhappiness and strategize accordingly. I have assumed disappointment and planned only to maximize the value I could extract from it. Steadfastness and loyalty are fine traits, but too often I have used them to prolong situations that I should instead have ended. Lean into your work, force that plow past stone and stump, and for all your diligence? At the end of the season you have still rended the breast of the earth. It is harder to heal that soil than it is to…
 
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    Next Nature Network

  • The Bamboo Skyscraper

    Alessia Andreotti
    29 Aug 2015 | 1:24 am
    A group of architects looked at natural forests to design the bamboo skyscraper. The post The Bamboo Skyscraper appeared first on Next Nature Network. Related posts: Self–Repairing Architecture The Story of our Food Yes, Naturally
  • Technology Made us Human

    Van Mensvoort
    28 Aug 2015 | 7:00 am
    Buckle up for a cinematic espresso shot from performance philosopher and NNN ambassador Jason Silva. The post Technology Made us Human appeared first on Next Nature Network. Related posts: The Technium Next Landscapes Humane Technology #2: Revive Human Intuitions
  • Turning Poop Back Into Food

    Alessia Andreotti
    27 Aug 2015 | 6:58 am
    Nasa funded a program to turn astronauts’ poop into food. The post Turning Poop Back Into Food appeared first on Next Nature Network. Related posts: The Story of our Food A Stroll Through the Bubbles of Chemicals and Men Anthropomorphobia
  • Visualizing the World Economy

    Van Mensvoort
    25 Aug 2015 | 2:11 pm
    This Is What $15.3 Trillion of World Trade Looks Like. The post Visualizing the World Economy appeared first on Next Nature Network. Related posts: Meet Humanity beyond Race, it’s Beautiful The Story of our Food Economy, as Seen From Space
  • Electronic Gadget Cemetery in Ghana

    Yunus Emre Duyar
    24 Aug 2015 | 6:13 am
    Agbogbloshie is a former wetland that is turned into a slum and now it is full of toxic electronic waste. The post Electronic Gadget Cemetery in Ghana appeared first on Next Nature Network. Related posts: The Playboy Interview Simulacra and Simulations Echte Natuur is niet Groen
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    Birding Dude

  • NYC Audubon Shorebird Walk at Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge

    19 Aug 2015 | 7:15 am
    9:30 am, is not my idea of a bird walk, let alone a shorebird walk. When Darren Klein of NYC Audubon approached me about subbing for Gabriel Willow in leading a shorebird walk at Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge, I was hesitant for many reasons. However, my love of shorebirds and teaching others the little I know won the day and so it was August 15th, that I found myself waiting at the visitor's center for my attendees. I had several friends on the Pond who were texting me intel and based on their feedback I decided, we needed to bird the north end of the pond. After working out the car pooling…
  • Shorebirding at Jamaica Bay 2015 -- A Season of Frustration

    10 Aug 2015 | 6:52 am
    We are into our second week in August. While the water level is currently where it should have been at the end of July on the East Pond of Jamaica Bay, we are faced with additional challenges that have contributed to a rather disastrous shorebird season thus far.The biggest issue outside of the water level is Algae! The East Pond, is laden with a thick Algal mat which has covered most of the mudflats on the north and south ends. Realizing this could be problematic, I broke some of it up on the north end while out there keeping an eye on the water level. What I did not realize was how thick it…
  • Juvenile Least Sandpiper

    8 Aug 2015 | 9:34 pm
    A closely cropped juvenile Least Sandpiper, photographed on the East Pond of Jamaica Bay in Queens NY. I wanted the emphasis to be be on certain field marks. Notice how fresh the plumage is on this bird. Tags: Least Sandpiper, Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge
  • 2015 Shorebird Season in Jeopardy at Jamaica Bay?

    24 Jul 2015 | 7:28 am
    Not so fast! If I were the type to throw in the towel, I would have thrown my hands in the air and walked away after taking an East Pond water level read out on June 12th. On that day, I could see the water level dropping as evidenced by the old water mark on the Phragmites but something seemed amiss. Not again was the first thought I had!Every summer, shorebirders in the NY area especially from the 5 boroughs and Long Island, look forward to the annual pilgrimage to Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge in Queens. With the West Pond pretty much out of commission, due to Hurricane Sandy, the East Pond…
  • Shorebirds Are The Shiznit!

    10 Jul 2015 | 11:17 pm
    Don't you agree?  Many birders go wild over wood warblers during migration and I see loads of posts about radar this or radar that and folks are usually chomping at the bit for that first wave of warblers to hit our soil. Me, I am from the Bobby Kurtz school of Calidridmanics, the ones who perk up at the mere mention of the word, "shorebirds." I just can't wait for shorebird season to get under way, in fact when the season winds down in NY, I begin the countdown to the next season. If I ever leave New York to live elsewhere, it will have to be a place where I could at least get in some…
 
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    Farmgirl Fare

  • Recipe: Lemon Rosemary Zucchini Bread

    Farmgirl Susan
    25 Aug 2015 | 1:16 pm
    Lemon zest and fresh rosemary add a flavorful twist to this just-sweet-enough quick bread (recipe here).Zucchini bread recipes are a dime a dozen, but this Lemon Rosemary Zucchini Bread really stands out from the crowd.This is not a savory quick bread, but it calls for less sugar than many zucchini bread recipes, along with some whole wheat flour and olive oil, so it doesn't feel like you're eating cake for breakfast. (Not that there's anything wrong with eating cake for breakfast.) It also makes a delicious afternoon snack.The flavors of the rosemary and lemon are pleasantly subtle, but you…
  • Recipe: Greek Style Panzanella Salad with Cherry Tomatoes and Pan-Fried Olive Oil Croutons

    Farmgirl Susan
    13 Aug 2015 | 5:05 pm
    This traditional Italian bread salad is given a Greek twist with feta cheese and kalamata olives. Crunchy pan-fried olive oil croutons are hard to resist (recipe here).I'm so happy that the pretty little fruits on my two big Sun Sugar cherry tomato plants have finally started to ripen because this Greek Style Panzanella Salad is one of my favorite summer recipes. I'd never been a fan of panzanella, which I always thought of as soggy bread salad, until a few years ago when I came across Ina Garten's Greek style version.I have five words for you: pan-fried olive oil croutons.This colorful salad…
  • Baker's Blues by Judi Hendricks: A Giveaway and Conversation with the Author

    Farmgirl Susan
    3 Aug 2015 | 10:38 am
    One of the best things about writing Farmgirl Fare for the past ten (!) years has been making friends and meeting so many wonderful people from around the world.I was already a huge fan of Judith Ryan Hendricks' Bread Alone and The Baker's Apprentice when Lisa Munley at TLC Book Tours contacted me back in 2009 to see if I was interested in being part of a tour for Judi's new book, The Laws of Harmony.Of course I jumped at the chance (and loved the book), and Judi and I have been great friends ever since, emailing back and forth and chatting on the phone every couple of months for…
  • Easy Blueberry Bonanza Bars with Streusel and Oats — Recipe and Rave Reviews

    Farmgirl Susan
    25 Jul 2015 | 2:54 pm
    Celebrate a blueberry bonanza with this super popular triple layer, anytime sweet treat (recipe here).These scrumptious Blueberry Bonanza Breakfast Bars are my favorite way to celebrate blueberry season. They can be made with either fresh or frozen blueberries, and they don't have to be eaten for breakfast. I originally wrote about them back in 2006, and they've been one of my most popular recipes ever since.Don't let the three separate layers scare you away; they come together quickly and you only need to dirty up two mixing bowls. They also freeze beautifully. With the oatmeal…
  • Recipe: Savory Tomato, Mozzarella, and Basil Pesto Pie with an Easy Cheesy Biscuit Crust

    Farmgirl Susan
    12 Jul 2015 | 3:07 pm
    Scared of pie dough? This easy biscuit crust is perfect for beginners (recipe here).It wouldn't be summer on the farm without a shout out for this longtime favorite recipe from the Farmgirl Fare recipe archives. Enjoy! Are there ripe tomatoes in your neck of the woods yet? I was really behind with spring planting in the kitchen garden this year (no surprise there!) so it's still going to be a while before we're picking any tomatoes from our 23 plants, but that's okay. We had a whopping five inches of rain in three days last week (unheard of in July; the creek is even running…
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    10,000 Birds

  • Where Are You Birding This Final Weekend of August 2015?

    Mike
    28 Aug 2015 | 2:43 pm
    As August goes, so go the summer doldrums (or winter lull, depending on your half of the world.) Not everyone experiences a dip in bird activity during the nonmigratory months, but those of us who do are ready to see some new birds NOW! Unfortunately for me, work will keep me indoors this weekend. If I’m lucky, something special will fly over my harried head. Corey will be out and about in the NYC area this weekend; if you are too, you’d be crazy to miss the 10th Annual Shorebird Festival at Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge. Seriously, Jamaica Bay has some of the best birding anywhere,…
  • What’s in a Name: Limpkin

    Carrie
    28 Aug 2015 | 9:56 am
    A friend was in Florida, and as people in Florida are wont to do, he taunted me with pictures of some good birds that I am not currently looking at. In this case, it was especially cruel because he posted a Limpkin, a bird I have never looked at. Another commenter asked the obvious, yet seldom-addressed, question: “Man, what do you have to do to an ornithologist to get called “limpkin”?” I didn’t know, so I made the obvious American Woodcock joke and the world kept turning. But the question has continued to haunt me. Finally, I was forced to do actual research.
  • A Tribute to a Wildlife Lover’s Support Team

    Suzie
    28 Aug 2015 | 4:00 am
    It’s a rough world for wildlife. It’s a rough world for people who appreciate them, rougher still for those who spend time and money trying to protect them, roughest of all for those who take in the injured and orphaned and try to save them. Part of a wildlife rehabilitator’s job description should be a willingness to have your heart smashed to bits over and over again. I routinely vow to put an emotional wall between the birds I care for and me, to keep in mind that a good percentage of them will not make it, and to realize my heart is already in pieces so I should protect…
  • Birdlife on Amazonian River Beaches

    Alfredo Begazo
    27 Aug 2015 | 6:20 am
    Seashores anywhere support very similar bird communities. A walk along an ocean beach is likely to result in sighting of terns, gulls and sandpipers with various bill lengths, and plovers. Some terns use the ocean at different depths, sandpipers use the surfline, and plovers other sections of the beach further inland. Aerial view of an Amazonian River showing exposed sandy beaches. Collared Plover. Photo Credits: Brian Ralphs Beaches formed along Amazonian rivers are not much different. Shores and sandbars along Amazonian rivers support a similar bird community, which includes resident and…
  • Cassin’s Finch at Lassen Volcanic National Park

    Larry
    26 Aug 2015 | 10:00 am
    As I mentioned in my last post, Lassen Volcanic National Park is a great birding destination. You can see some of my older Lassen Park posts featuring several other species from this beautiful park here. This week I am reporting on the Cassin’s Finch (Haemorhous cassinii), another western species found nesting in Lassen Volcanic National Park. This is the male of the species (click on photos for full sized images). If you have read many of my posts here at 10000 Birds, you may have noticed that much of my research on bird species is derived from Birds of North America Online (BNA), a…
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    simple.green.organic.happy.

  • I Wasted My Vacation, from Sunup to Sundown

    Robin Strong Elton
    18 Aug 2015 | 9:34 pm
    When anxious, uneasy and bad thoughts come, I go to the sea, and the sea drowns them out with its great wide sounds, cleanses me with its noise, and imposes a rhythm upon everything in me that is bewildered and confused. -Rainer Maria Rilke Every time we go to the beach I have all these grandiose plans. Imma gonna ride a bike, run in the mornings. I’m going to read at least three of these five books I packed. I’m going to photowalk every day and stock up on images for every situation. I’m going to write for hours every day and pull ahead of my content calendar. I’m…
  • Tips for Watching and Photographing the Perseid Meteor Shower

    Robin Strong Elton
    12 Aug 2015 | 11:31 am
    If the stars should appear one night in a thousand years, how would men believe and adore; and preserve for many generations the remembrance of the city of God which had been shown! But every night come out these envoys of beauty, and light the universe with their admonishing smile. ―Ralph Waldo Emerson The night sky is always amazing to behold and ponder, but in mid-August our little planet crosses paths with the Swift-Tuttle comet and pieces of debris enter the Earth’s atmosphere only to burn up in a shining blaze of glory. This year the peak is expected to be on the 13th, with…
  • The 3 Most Precious Resources of Life

    Robin Strong Elton
    11 Aug 2015 | 10:00 am
      If I were to name the three most precious resources of life, I should say books, friends, and Nature; and the greatest of these, at least the most constant and always at hand, is nature. Nature we have always have with us, an inexhaustible storehouse of that which moves the heart, appeals to the mind, and fires the imagination— health to the body, a stimulus to the intellect, and joy to the soul. To the scientist Nature is a storehouse of facts, laws, processes; to the artist she is a storehouse of pictures; to the poet she is a storehouse of images, fancies, a source of inspiration;…
 
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    Steve Creek Outdoors

  • Doe Feeding Her Fawn

    Steve Creek
    29 Aug 2015 | 2:41 am
    I noticed that this Whitetail Doe and Fawn were getting to be regulars on the County Road I like to walk. I decided to find a spot to sit and see if I could get a few more photos of these two deer. If you remember I have photographed these two before. (Whitetail Fawn Checking With Her Mom and Whitetail Doe And Fawn Crossing Road) The first day I chose to sit I got behind my gate where the County Road ends. This was early in the morning and sure enough I spot the Doe feeding on the side of the road. I also noticed the Fawn with her and they were slowly getting closer to me. I was able to take…
  • A Snake On A Schedule

    Steve Creek
    27 Aug 2015 | 2:53 am
    I have seen a Rat Snake crossing an area that I keep mowed near my cabin and this has occurred two days in a row at about the same time. When I first spotted the snake it came out of the tall weeds up to the mowed area. It would raise up and look straight ahead like it was making sure it was safe to cross. Both times I saw it raise up like this it would take about a minute to look and then it would crawl straight ahead into more tall weeds. I was always to far away or I didn’t have my camera when I would see this happening. I decided on the third day that I would bring my stool and…
  • Up Close Look At A Grasshopper

    Steve Creek
    25 Aug 2015 | 1:34 am
    I first spotted this Grasshopper on a weed and I took several photos of it since it was letting me get close. I didn’t like the background so I picked it up and moved it to a log. I was surprised I even caught it and I was really surprised when it didn’t hop away when I placed it where I wanted it. It did spit brown liquid on me in protest. This Grasshopper even moved around giving me different angles. I even had another Grasshopper show up for the photo shoot. Grasshopper – Canon 7D2 | Canon EF100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L v2 | @400mm | 1/640 | f/10 | ISO 640 Grasshopper –…
  • Whitetail Fawn Checking With Her Mom

    Steve Creek
    23 Aug 2015 | 2:52 am
    I was on one of my many walks down a County Road that ends at my property when I spot a Whitetail Doe and Fawn feeding. I have photographed these two before but I was a lot closer this time. I am standing in the road and I am not dressed like I normally am while out photographing wildlife. I am wearing blue jeans and a black t-shirt. I don’t like wearing black because I am afraid the wildlife will think I am a Bear. I have discovered that after the Bear has been in the area the wildlife disappear for a day or two. The Fawn looks right at me and then looks over at her Mom. The Doe checks…
  • My Essentials For Hiking With My Camera

    Steve Creek
    21 Aug 2015 | 2:48 am
    I thought I would share with everyone what I take with me on short hikes to photograph wildlife. Normally, I wear my camera on a BlackRapid strap so that I can get to my camera quickly to photograph wildlife. When I hike 2 or 3 miles I will take my camera backpack. I have a Lowepro backpack that I use for carrying my Canon 7D2 with a Canon EF100-400mm lens attached (extra battery). I do this mainly to protect my camera because I like bushwhacking and I don’t want the limbs hitting my camera. The downside is that I have to take my pack off to get to the camera if I see something while…
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    Conservation Jobs

  • The Devil’s Return

    Alex Taylor
    27 Aug 2015 | 2:23 am
    Tasmanian devils once roamed the entire Australian continent, but around 3,000 years ago they went extinct on the mainland. They are now confined to Tasmania although even here populations are decreasing, thanks to devil facial tumour disease. New research however, has assessed the ecological impact of returning Tasmanian devils to the mainland and the results show that doing so would improve Australia’s biodiversity. It is believed that Tasmanian devils died out on mainland Australia because of hunting by dingoes. Today, dingoes are culled to protect livestock. This has shifted the…
  • Ripple Africa & Their Fight Against Deforestation

    Guest Bloggers
    20 Aug 2015 | 4:43 am
    In September the world will come together in New York to decide on the Sustainable Development Goals. These will help direct the global effort towards sustainability. Forests are mentioned in only one draft – the one on environment – yet they contribute to almost all of them. RIPPLE Africa are trying to put forests in the frame and have entered a video competition to tell the world how forests fit into the bigger picture. Please help us by watching this 2 minute video “Forests can live without people, but people can’t live without forests” and leaving a comment by clicking on the…
  • Resurgence of the World’s Rarest Penguin

    Alex Taylor
    18 Aug 2015 | 6:31 am
    The Galapagos Islands, a chain of islands 600 miles wide west of mainland Ecuador, are home to the only species of penguin in the Northern Hemisphere. The Galapagos penguin is also world’s rarest penguin. Added to the endangered species list in 2000, their numbers have plummeted in recent decades. The decline started in the early 1980s when a strong El Nino – a time when sea surface temperatures in the tropical Pacific Ocean are unusually warm – caused populations to fall from 2,000 to less than 500 individuals. Dogs, cats and rates introduced to the islands also attacked penguins,…
  • Historical Records Track Gibbon Decline

    Alex Taylor
    12 Aug 2015 | 1:14 am
    The decline of endangered species can usually be tracked over several decades, but the Zoological Society of London has recently documented the changing distributions of gibbons in China using historical records dating back 400 years. Their study, published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, is one of the first instances of the use of ancient records to reconstruct the decline of endangered species. Today, gibbons are some of China’s most threatened species, surviving in only a few remote forest patches in the far southwest of the country. All four species face extinction. Two species…
  • Return to Oz – The Recovery of the Humpback Whale

    Alex Taylor
    4 Aug 2015 | 7:41 am
    Australia is a country with one of the highest numbers of species that are facing extinction, decline, or negative human impacts. However, improvements have been seen in the past decade, with several occurrences of animals rebounding or thriving. One example is the humpback whale, as a new study published in Marine Policy has revealed. The study reviewed a vast amount of data which had been collected in past studies. Humpback whales breed in waters off the east and west coasts of Australia. Both populations are currently listed as ‘vulnerable’ by the Environment Protection and…
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    Birding Pictures

  • Red-headed Woodpecker–Bird of the Day!

    Lauren Shaffer
    20 Aug 2015 | 10:11 am
    Red-headed Woodpeckers are fairly rare in our area, so it’s a treat to catch a sighting of their bold white patches on black wings, bright red head, and stark white belly. They nest in the excavated holes of dead trees and they require an under-story that is clear. Cornell’s website, All About Birds, says that it is sometimes called the “Flying Checkerboard” because of its dramatic coloring. This year, my birding friends and I found three nesting pairs within a few miles of each other!Red-headed Woodpeckers often have two broods in a summer. Since we just discovered…
  • Bird of the Day: American Redstart building a nest

    Lauren Shaffer
    3 Aug 2015 | 8:07 am
        During the Acadia Birding Festival, I took a morning off to meander by myself along the shore and the road near our hotel. Some movement caught my eye low in the brushy area beside the road. A female American Redstart was busy stripping the long fibers of a dead branch in the thicket.     She had to work plenty hard in order to pull off this long fiber!     To my delight, I could see her fly immediately to her little cup-like nest that she was working on about 3 feet up from the ground. I never would have noticed it unless I had seen her fly directly to it…
  • Bird of the Day: Green Heron

    Lauren Shaffer
    17 Jul 2015 | 6:05 pm
    After getting so many interesting and beautiful photos, that I can’t seem to keep up with my blog, I’ve decided to do some of my posts as “Bird of the Day” with very little commentary. Hope you enjoy the pictures, and hopefully more frequent posts! These photos of the Green Heron were from the kayak at Rose Valley Lake in PA this morning. Getting hungry! Oh, there’s a little fishy! Darn!! Missed again! That makes me SO MAD!! Come on, shake it off!! You can do this! OK, let’s try this again! I know it’s not good to be anthropomorphic, meaning to…
  • Razorbills and Common Murres: Birding Machias Seal Island

    Lauren Shaffer
    19 Jun 2015 | 4:23 pm
    Razorbills and Common Murres were among the penguin-like birds that were observed on our trip to Machias Seal Island, along with the Atlantic Puffin. All of these species are Alcids. Razorbills and Murres look very similar with their black and white coloring, but the Razorbills have a very thick, blunt bill with a white line going back towards the front of the eye. They spend their lives at sea, coming to rocky coasts and cliffs only to nest. They are great divers, able to dive up to 120 meters, dining on krill and fish, and are often seen in large rafts close to shore. The middle bird below…
  • Atlantic Puffins on Machias Seal Island

    Lauren Shaffer
    7 Jun 2015 | 6:12 pm
    Seeing Atlantic Puffins was the principle reason for wanting to go birding in Maine this Spring. Getting there by boat can be iffy, depending on the fog and the wind. When the seas are too rough to land on Machias Seal Island, one of three islands where Puffins nest, they can at least be observed from a rocking boat. My friends and I were on a Road Scholar trip called “Chickadees, Grouse, Puffins and More: A Birder’s Dream in Down East Maine.” Of course we hoped for getting our bins on Spruce Grouse (didn’t happen) and Boreal Chickadee (barely happened), but the…
 
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    Blooms Today

  • Creating a Beautiful Garden Fresh Centerpiece

    Blooms Today
    11 Aug 2015 | 6:18 am
    In the spring and summer months and even into fall, a garden centerpiece can elevate your occasion from a nice gathering to a great event. The trick is deciding on what to include in your centerpiece and how to present it. There are so many options for your garden fresh centerpiece that you can have a new presentation every time you have guests to entertain.       Choosing Your Elements With a garden plant tablescape, there are a few considerations that will dictate the way you arrange your table and which plants you include. Think about the shape of your table. Round and…
  • Latest Arrivals: Blooms Today Announces Launch of New Gift Box Bouquets

    Blooms Today
    5 Aug 2015 | 10:07 am
        Blooms Today is excited to announce the launch of our brand new gift box bouquets. Hand-picked by experienced floral designers, these new displays are filled with beautiful fresh flowers and artfully arranged into one of our many new designer vases. Each bouquet is unique and refreshing with exquisite fragrance and seasonal elegance.   Springtime Happiness The Springtime Happiness Bouquet shines bright and lovely as it transforms any setting into a beautiful garden of daisies, alstroemeria, and soft roses. These flowers are picked fresh and thoughtfully arranged together…
  • Tips for Taking Care of Peonies

    Blooms Today
    9 Jul 2015 | 11:23 am
    Every yard looks great with a few peonies. These soft, billowing perennial blooms come to life in spring and early summer, with their pink, white, and yellow blooms standing out atop green undergrowth. There are roughly 30 different species of peonies that grow to be more impressive year after year. Peonies do well with both full and partial sun exposure in US zones 3-8. Some may even outlive the person who planted them, reaching a lifespan of 100 years or more. Very easy to care for, these plants are perfect flowering additions to any hedgerow, flower bed, or yard. Types of Peonies There…
  • Caring for Your Hydrangea

    Blooms Today
    6 Jul 2015 | 8:47 am
    Hydrangeas are beautiful flowering shrubs that can grow well in many different environments. The popular clustered flowers are commonly associated with an older time and a southern charm. They bloom in the summer and fall in brilliant colors, including pink, blue, purple, and white. Commonly used in wedding flower arrangements and summer wreaths, these popular shrubs are delightful in virtually any yard or garden. Maybe you’ve inherited a hydrangea or moved to a home with a shrub already in place. However you came across this jewel of a plant, there are some caring tips that can help you…
  • Working With Silk Flowers

    Blooms Today
    15 Jun 2015 | 8:04 am
    Silk flowers are a lovely way to create a permanent piece of floral art for dresses, hair, and other arrangements meant to last longer than their fresh counterparts. High quality artificial flowers are much more than the mass-produced flowers that you see in a craft store. These hand-made flowers are hand dyed and formed into individual flower petals. The practice of creating handmade flowers is an art form. A well-made artificial flower is nearly indiscernible from real flowers unless you touch them.   Interestingly, silk flowers are rarely made from silk anymore. Instead, they are…
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    Friendly Eco Might

  • President Obama Takes Good Step To Combat Climate Change

    3 Aug 2015 | 7:47 pm
    President Barack Obama divulged the last form of his plan to significantly cut emissions from U.S. Power plants, as he cautioned again that climate change will debilitate future eras if left unchecked.Touting the arrangement at a White House meet on Monday, 3rd August 2015, Mr. Obama said the exceptional carbon dioxide cutoff limits are "the absolute most essential step" America has ever taken to combat climate change. He cautioned that in light of the fact that the issue is so vast, if the world doesn't hit the nail on the head rapidly, it may get to be difficult to reverse, not allowing…
  • Rise In Sea Level Threatens Endangered Turtles

    31 Jul 2015 | 1:50 am
    Many analysts found what higher tides mean for green sea turtles at their nesting sites. Because of climate change, the world's sea levels are rising and we're just starting to comprehend the diverse effects those progressions will have. Notwithstanding for species that live a large portion of their lives at sea, the rising tides could be an issue. Researchers at Raine Island, an Australian island that is a piece of the Great Barrier Reef, found that ocean level changes are awful for green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas). Raine Island is a nesting ground for the endangered turtles, almost…
  • Sleep Plays A Vital Role In Memory

    16 Jul 2015 | 12:26 am
    Sleeping has a vital part in enduring memories, however contention stays about whether the mind serves to make these by erasing superfluous connections or by fortifying important ones. Presently the most recent research proposes that both procedures happen during sleep. A study in the journal PLOS Computational Biology recommends that sleeping triggers the neurotransmitters in our brain to both strengthen and debilitate which prompts the forgetting or modification of our memories in a procedure called as long term potentiation (LTP). Scientists drove by Sidarta Ribeiro at the Brain Institute…
  • Owl Wings Inspire To Design Silent Wind Turbines

    12 Jul 2015 | 12:40 am
    The most normally heard complaint about wind turbines is that they are noisy. Wind farms are normally set up far from communities that the noise is insignificant, however another biomimetic innovation enlivened by the stealthy flight of owls could prompt wind turbines, planes and PC fans that are for all virtually quiet. Why Do We Need Silent Wind Turbines? This would not just calm the turbines and make groups more open to having them close-by, but since wind turbines are intensely braked so as to keep noise to a small extent, having an approach to make them work discreetly could imply that…
  • Why You Should Drink Warm Water With Lemon And Honey

    3 Jul 2015 | 9:30 am
    While we are preparing our most loved beverages, like tea or coffee, we add honey, lemon or some ingredients which sweeten or enhance the taste. However, in the event that you consider it, those ingredients are very healthy naturally. We know that, keeping ourselves hydrated amid the day is truly important for our body. Nevertheless, a solution of water and honey is an effective mixture that will do miracles for you and your health. Honey is one of the healthiest and most used foods since ages. The advantages from eating honey are numerous and are amazing. We have brought you some of…
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